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A PRODUCTION BOCK FOR WAITING FOR GO^OT 

If 6 

RUTH AM BAKER 
B. A., Fort Hays Kansas State College, 19 52 



A MASTER'S THESIS 



submitted in partial fulfillment of the 



requirements for the degree 



MASTER OF ARTS 



Deoartmont of Speech 



KA1T3AS STATE UNIVERSITY 
Manhattan, Kansas 

1964 



Approved by: 



9 



iiajor Professor 



Xiiif 

D<5CCI/M£vi"' TABLE OF CONTENTS 

THEMATIC MATERIAL 9 

THE ACTORS 21 

SETTING 40 

LIGHTING 57 

SCRIPT . . 60 

REHEARSAL DATA 210 

PERFORMANCE DATA 212 

LIST OF WORKS CONSULTED 213 



EXPLANATION FOR PLATE I 
Program for Waiting for Godot 



WAITING FOR GODOT 



THE DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH 
Presents: 



Thesis Production presented in partial fulfillment 
of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts 



PURPLE MASQUE EXPERIMENTAL THEATRE 

MAY 15 and 16, 1961i-8:00 p.m. 



WAITING FOR GCXOT 
GAar By Samuel Beckett 

Estragon. ...... .John Dillon Director Ruth Ann Baker* 

Vladimir .„..„,. .John Hawkins Assistant Direct or . . .Judy Lee Taylor* 

Lucky. .......... Boyd Masten Technical Assistant . .Clayton Hawes* 

Pozzo. „„„..„..,. Larry Hovey Light Design Clayton Hawes* 

Boy...., „,..,... Doug Powell House Manager Fred Williams* 

Business Manager David Sadkin* 

STUDENT PRODUCTION STAFF 

Scenery: Clayton Hawes*, Ken Seibel, Judy Lee Taylor* 

Lights: Harvey Goldberg, Arthur Garvin 

Make-up: Glenda Apt, Pam Robinson, Michele Clark, Margaret Noller 

Costumes: Kitty Barker* 

Chorogrt.phys Margaret Middleton 

Publicity: Tish Dace*, Mary Adams, Kitty Barker*, Stew McDermit, Jamie Aiken, 
Patsy"TTees, Clayton Hawes*, Judy Lee Taylor*. 

Properties: Pam Robinson, Glenda Apt 

ZSZ^^^gQf^gp^Tgi-'-'K 1 ^ 6 . prayers™" — "• , , • — 

STATEMENT FROM THE DIRECTOR : 

Don't ; let rumors and psuedo-intellectual statements about this play 
scare you. out of the fun of seeing it. Don ! t struggle to "understand the-" 
basic theme" while you are watching it. The play is different-.-'- It is unique. 
It dbes not fit .any 'preconceived notions of how-a-pTay should work. It 
cannot be placed in any "mold" but it ""Is an enjoyable piece of drama. I 
consider it a highly-significant work, whether you personally agree with 
this. last statement or not the play is to be seen. It can be appreciated on. 
any level that you wish to accept it. Listen gently. ■■'"',]., ,„ >' : 



THEATRE STAFF FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH 



Dennis Denning . , „ , , b .Direct or 
Wallace Dace »o, Associate Director 
Jack Rast.,..,, Technical Direct an... 
Betty Cleary . . , . . c : . SJ ^*-«-...-.-Ocrg6umer 
Patsy Rees,, ... , ., Theatre Secretary ' 
Norma Bunton. u Jlead, Dept .. of 

Speech 



WATTING FOR GODOT is produced by 
special arrangement with the 
Dramatists Play Service. 



MEDEA , 



^Special Presentation for Alumni.,. May 30, 8:30 p.m. All-Faith Chapel 



NATIONAL COLLEGIATE PLAYERS 



KANSAS STATE PLAYERS ' 



OFFICERS: •' 

David' Sadkin.... President 

Judy Lee Taylor.,. 1st Vice-President 

Janet Coleman 2nd Vice-President 

Bobi Sadkin... Secretary-Treasurer 



OFFICERS : 

Clayton Hawes.. ..President 
Betty Cary.... Vice-President 

Boyd Masten Hist orian 

Fred Williams. .. .Secretary 



ACKNOWLEDGIIEKTS 



Gary Johnson 
Susan Murray 
Ronald Schindler- ■ ■ 
Marilyn Kimbr ought 



Leanna Lenhart 
Mrs. J. A. Hollis 
' Gienda Apt 



Boyd Masten 
Bill Robinson 
Mrs. Betty Cleary 



PLATE II 



Play Is Mystifying, But Fun 

You will probably be mysti- ness and hopelessness of man- cinating manner by Boyd Mas- 

fied by it, and you may not kind endlessly waiting, never tin. Who they are, where they 

really "understand" it at all, understanding, permanently en- are from, and wither they are 

but if you go see it (and you trapped in the meaninglessness going, nobody knows, but, as 

should) you will probably thor- of day to day existence. He sees Vladimir observes, they help 

oughly enjoy it. Samuel Beck- it, to be sure as basically ab* enliven the day and pass the 

ett's "Waiting for. Godot" on surd, but he also sees it piti- deadening weight of time. By the 

display tonight and tomorrow in ful, hilarious frightening, dis- time, they have made their last 

East, Stadium's Purple Masque gusting, ironic, and ridiculous, exit, and the two tramps reas- 

Theatre is another of the se- All of these elements are sert that they can no longer 

ries of fine productions from' clearly articulated in this pro- wait, but must go, yet remain 

the Kansas State Department of duction, most ably directed by forever rooted in the muck of 

Speech and -the K-State Players Ruth Ann Baker. ' their drab world, the audience 

offered this college year. It is, The two tramps Estragon, fl as an uncanny feeling that 

as well, the most difficult to ex- L^*-^ bv John Dmon a _ d something profound has been 

plain. Generally speaking,, the ^TV*. "J Jonn Dillon, and sajd _ w ^ ^^ . f 

viewer -will get out of it. exact- Vladimir by John Hawkins, remains undefined, 

ly what he wants to - no more, move Wlth sklU through their 

no i es5t nightmare life as they perpetual- Miss Baker, who has present- 

- . - ] y awa j(; the never- arriving Go- ed this play to the Department 

Certainly Beckett, the f I r s t dot. Into their midst come Poz- of Speech as her master's thes- 

widely recognized playwright of zo, the slave-driver, interpreted is, is to be heartily congratu- 

what has been dubbed- the "dra- by Larry Hovey, and his tortur- lated, and her entire cast is to 

ma of the absurd" has some- ed servant, Lucky, portrayed in be complimented for a hard job 

thing to say about.the helpless- a .grotesque and strangely fas- extremely well done. -JT.Y.M. 



EXPLANATION OF PLATE III 



Collegian Review by Dr. Charles Fennel 
May 15, 1964 






PLATE III 



B 



eview 






Nothing Is Certain, but Godot's Great 



By CMAUI.ES pennel 

Assistant Professor of English -• 

About Waiting lor Godot it is only possible to re- 
peat Gogo's puzzled comment: "Nothing is certain" 
—nothing, that is, except that Ruth Ann Baker 
and her cast have produced a fine evening of thea- 
tre at the Purple Masque (tonight and Saturday 
al 8:00 p.m.). Godot itself is a strange, frighten- 
ing, funny set of non-variations on the theme of 
the futility of the human condition. Two tramps, 
Gogo and Didi, wait endlessly and confusedly for 
Godot — or do they? or is it Godot? or are we all 
dreaming? Neither the characters nor the audi- 
ence can tell. The audience can, however, recog- 
nize the ambiguous agony of Pozzo and Lucky 
(who is master and who is servant?) and the pain- 
ful ennui of the tramps as mirror images of their 
own experience. 

THE PLAY opens on a stage, bare except for a 
scrubby tree of some kind — "A willow," Didi 
guesses — and Gogo, painfully and ineffectively at- 
tempting to remove his boots. He is soon joined 
by Didi, his comrade in the daily and endless wait 
for the mysterious Godot. In response to Gogo's 
futile conclusion to his struggle with his boot, 
"Nothing is to be done," Didi muses: "I'm begin- 
ning to come round to that opinion. All my life 
I've tried to put it from me, saying Didi, be reason- 
able, you haven't yet tried everything. And I re- 
sumed the struggle." And thus we are off on a 



round of horrible and hilarious non-sequiturs. 

THE CAST is uniformly excellent. John Dillon 
and John Hawkins, as Gogo and Didi, play well 
together. Both manage the difficult problem of 
building from the blocks of repetition a climax of 
futility and frustration that is at the same time 
inconsequential and pitiable. But they are not 
mere Siamese twins. Hawkins makes of Didi. the 
type of the analytical modern man, confident at 
least occasionally that his surrealistic logic will 
finally explain things. Dillon's Gogo, on the other' 
hand, wants to be left alone to sleep and to have 
someone to whom he can tell his nightmares. 

In some ways, Larry Hovey's Pozzo is. the tri- 
umph of the evening. Tied to Lucky by the rope 
he holds, he alternates pompous brutality, tortured 
awareness and inexpressible indifference to the 
plight of his fellows and himself. Doug Powell 
gives the proper air of tainted innocence to his 
portrayal of the boy who continually brings the 
invariable message from Godot — a message that 
is an all too familiar mixture of hope and despair: 
"Mr. Godot told me to tell you he won't come this 
evening but surely to-morrow." 

THE RESPONSIBILITIES of the technical crew- 
are comparatively small; some clever make-up for 
Lucky and a few lighting changes account for most 
of their visible duties. The play goes forward at a 
brisk pace that indicates some sure-handed direc- 
tion on the part of Miss Baker. 



EXPLANATION OF PLATE IV 



Collegian-Student Reaction by Edward Hoffmans 
May 21, 1964 



PLATE IV 



Reflections on K-State Theater 



Standard Stage Realism Surpassed 



EDWARD HOFFMAN'S 

English Grarluato 

The K-State theater repertory for 
this semester featured three kinds of 
theatrical stylizatioM that were ex- 
treme departures from conventional 
stage realism. In view of the total 
unfamiliarity of the majority of K- 
State's potential theater audience 
with Medea, The Consul, and Waiting 
for Godot, these productions repre- 
sented radical theatrical experiments. 

THE STAGING of Greek tragedy, 
expressionistic musical drama, and 
theater of the absurd during a single 
semester indicates that those respon- 
sible for K-State theater are daring 
enough to advance the status of 
campus drama, and the .skill with 
which theso productions were ex- 
ecuted shows that these people also 
possess sufficient energy and resource- 
fulness to express their challenging 
visions. 

In my opinion, Medea was the best 
production of this semester's season. 
The presentation of Greek tragedy to 
any state university audience by col- 
lege students is a risky venture, the 
peril of which far surpasses that .of 
staging musical drama in a physically 
disadvantageous environment or of 
producing the newest type of modern 



drama to a generally conservative 
theater audience. 

ALTHOUGH the . acting in Medea 
was undoubtedly good, it was not the 
chief vehicle for the play's theatrical 
viability, The theatrical tool that 
made this play work was its blocking 
and choreography, and the most im- 
pressive result of this tool's compet- 
ent manipulation was the harmonious 
and consistent integration of the 
chorus' function with that of the 
actors who delineated the main char- 
acters. 

An outstanding example of good 
blocking sustained the attention of the 
audience and the intense emotional 
key of the play during the very long 
speech in which a messenger tells 
Medea about the death of Jason's sec- 
ond wife and her father. The block- 
ing and choreography of Medea re- 
vealed not only vivid theatrical imagi- ■ 
nation on the part of its director, but 
also expert accommodation of his 
imaginative vision to the play's physi- 
cal setting, for the kind of blocking 
and choreography permitted by the 
All-Faiths chapel's structure would 
not succeed so well in the Auditorium 
nor the Purple Masque Theater. 

THE QUALITY of acting in The 
Consul . was not indispensable to its 



success; this play, like Medea, was, 
effective primarily by the excellence 
of its spectacle. 

IN WAITING FOR GODOT, good 
acting had more to do with the play's 
theatrical efficiency than in Medea 
or The Consul. But the quality of 
Godot's acting was reinforced con- 
siderably by the physical intimacy be- 
tween actor and audience in the Pur- 
ple Masque, and by blocking that was 
in precise agreement with the clown- 
like costumes and makeup. ' This- 
play's blocking also consistently illus- 
trated the subtle relationship between 
Didi and Gogo: the endless, aimless, 
nervous shuffling of John Hawkins 
(Didi) and his insistent prodding of 
the stationary John Dillon (Gogo) 
into frenzied sequences of fruitless ac- 1 
tion gave a telling impulse to the 
play's theme of anxious savior-seek- 
ing. 

I am deeply grateful for the pres- 
ence on our campus of the requisite 
elements of creative theater, and I 
greatly admire the reflection of these 
elements in Medea, The Consul, and 
Waiting for Godot. My hope is that 
these vital theatrical forces will soon 
stimulate the realization of such in- 
tegral concomitants as adequate phy- 
sical facilities and larger audiences* ■ 



THEMATIC MATERIAL 

Waiting for Godot is Beckett's way of challenging man to 
face a condition which, by its very nature, encourages him to do 
anything except face it. Beckett is deliberately giving no answers. 
The horror of man's condition seems to be that there are no 
answers. In a way he is making fun of all people who expect to 
find an answer for their feeling of insecurity. He plays upon 
all the insecurities of modern man. In Waiting for Godot there 
are no "sure" things. The tramps are not even sure that Godot 
hasn't already come. The simple "laws" of humanity seem at times to 
be reversed. Vladimir tries to reason his way through to some security 
or knowledge. Estragon tries to go to sleep to avoid coming to grips 
with the reality he cannot stand but even this solution is poor for 
nightmares trouble his sleep. Even the laws of nature are mixed up. 
Both men talk about a Christian concept of God but faith in it does 
not seem to help them. Even friendship cannot give security for the 
two often have difficulty communicating and always talk of parting. 

Beckett seems to be saying, "Face up to what you are; where you 
are and stop looking for security. The only security for man lies 
in the fact that there is no security of any kind." He portrays 
this by showing in the play the failure of humanitarianism, science, 
nature, religion and friendship. The only answer lies in the fact 
that there is no answer. He projects this to his audience by means 
of alternating currents of hope and despair. 

The failure of humanitarianism is portrayed in the relationship 



10 



between Pozzo and Lucky. By recognized laws of human relationship 
Lucky should resent his treatment. He is beaten and must follow 
every order given him. "He refused — once," says Pozzo with a sadistic 
grin and lets it be known that he won't dare refuse again. Despite 
his rough treatment Lucky remains totally loyal and unaiffected by 
gestures of friendship from the other two men. He even kicks Estragon 
as he attempts to comfort him when Pozzo makes him cry. In the 
second act it is apparent that Lucky is capable of freeing himself 
but he prefers to stay in the service of one who beats him. 

Beckett further makes fun of the humanitarian attitude by the 
way he has Vladimir treat Pozzo in the second act. Though Pozzo is 
in immediate need of help Vladimir spends five minutes talking about 
helping him. When they try to help him the first time they both fall 
and when they fall they lose all thought of helping anyone but 
themselves. It is Estragon who finally makes the initial effort to 
get Pozzo up. Neither of them receive any thanks for their assistance. 
Earlier the two of them are tempted to give Lucky a "good beating" 
but they don't, not because they don't want to hit someone who is 
already down but because he might resist. The Golden Rule has become 
"Do unto others before they can do unto you." Later they find that 
both Pozzo and Lucky were capable of getting up by themselves. 
The two men are not even too kind to each other. Estragon doesn't 
really seem to appreciate Vladimir's generosity with his carrots, 
turnips and radishes. He just takes them and complains about them. 
These actions demonstrate the reversal or the impotence of the laws 
of goodness and decency. 

Beckett uses the character of Vladimir to demonstrate the real 



11 

lack of answers in science. Vladimir represents man trying to find 

an explanation for himself through the science of logic and by his 

failure to come to any solution he shows the failure of science to 

really create a secure knbwable world. Vladimir is the more intellectual 

of the two. He tries to reason his way out of things. He tries to 

explain what happened to Estragon's boots. 

Estragon: You see, all that's a lot of bloody — 

Vladimir: AhJ I see what it is. Yes, I see what's 
happened . 

Estragon: All that's a lot of bloody — 

Vladimir: It's elementary. Someone came and took yours 
and left you his. 

Estragon: Why? 

Vladimir: His were too tight for him, so he took yours. 

Estragon: But mine were too tight. 

Vladimir: For you. Not for him. 
This exchange sounds very reasonable until it is discovered that 
these boots are too big for Estragon. Vladimir approaches their 
situation logically and continues this approach even though their 
situation is itself above logic. His analysis of the account of the 
two thieves fails to suggest any solution just as his analysis of their 
own predicament provides no answers. He puzzles over the Bible 
account of the two thieves. 

Vladimir: Then the two of them must have been damned. 

Estragon: And why not? 

Vladimir: But one of the four says that one of the two 
was saved. 

Estragon: Well? They don't agree and that's all there is 
to it. 



12 



Vladimir: But all four were there. And only one speaks 

of a thief being saved. Why believe him rather 
than the others? 

He never manages to get this puzzle straight. He is the more rational 

of the two heroes but it gains nothing for him. 

Lest anyone make the mistake of deciding that the best policy 
would be to stop thinking Beckett makes Estragon an example of trying 
to deal with the world in this fashion. He seems to represent the other 
side of man's nature. He is concerned with the physical aspects of 
the situation. He is tired. He wants to sleep. He is not unmindful 
of the horror of things as he might seem for he has nightmares to which 
Vladimir cannot bear to listen. He shows that it is impossible to 
remain completely unconscious of conditions. Leonard Pronko said of 
Estragon and Vladimir, "They are distinctly alive and memorable 
characterizations. The former is instinctual, eager for food, money, 
and sleep; the latter, analytical, possesses more dignity, and is 
given to philosophizing." 

In this play nothing is stable; nothing is sure. Even the most 
reliable laws of nature are mixed up. The most noted example of this 
is the ever present tree. In the first scene they pronounce it dead 
and to all appearances it is dead. But the next day, if the script 
can be believed, the tree has several leaves on it. 
Estragon: It must be spring. 
Vladimir: But in a single night! 

This phenomenon is not so frightening as the unreliable sun and 
moon. Here the natural order seems to be mixed up on a larger scale. 



Leonard Pronko, Avant-Garde : The Experimental Theatre in France 
(Berkeley and Los Angeles, 1964), p. 31. 



13 

When Vladimir is trying to tell Pozzo that it is evening Estragon 

keeps insisting that the sun is rising. When night does come it 

doesn't move in gently, it falls rapidly. Though these signs are 

few they are meaningful. Estragon says that they should "turn resolutely 

toward nature." Whereupon Vladimir comments gloomily that they have 

tried that before. The two men don't know what time it is, what day 

it is or even what time of year it is. There is nothing in this 

world they can really depend upon. A further look at the play demonstrates 

that there is nothing out of this world they can depend upon either. 

Waiting for Godot is not a play depicting Christian religious 
convictions though it is viewed as such by many people. It would be 
difficult to say that it has no religious significance. Beckett seems 
to want to deny man not necessarily any religion, but any religion 
which provides all the answers. The religious significance is not 
necessarily Christian but Western man lives with such a backlog of 
Christian religious tradition that the first impulse is to associate the 
religious connotations in the play with the Christian religion rather 
than look for the broader implications that might be present. 

Beckett himself denies any particular religious significance in 

the Christian sense. When asked about the theme of the play he 

sometimes refers to a passage in the writings of St. Augustine: 

"There is a wonderful sentence in Augustine. .. 'Do not 
despair: one of the thieves was saved. Do not presume: 
one of the thieves was damned . ' I am interested in the shape 
of ideas even if I do not believe in them... That sentence 
has a wonderful shape. It is the shape that matters." 1 

To the many people to whom the question of their situation is 



1 Martin Esslin, The Theatre of the Absurd . (Garden City, New 
York, 1961), p. 294. 



14 



directly concerned with a personal God this play probably appears 
as a drama with Christian religious meaning. They don't notice 
that it also has discouraging things to say about the other security 
devices already discussed. To those who have rejected the Christian 
concept of a personal god the play is still meaningful and relevant. 

The last convention that Beckett attacks is friendship. In his 
work on Proust he comments on the impossibility of possession in love, 
and the illusion of friendship: "...if love... is a function of 
man's sadness, friendship is a function of his cowardice..." 
Estragon and Vladimir discuss parting company but they can't for they 
are dependent on one another. Over the years of dependency they have 
become fond of one another as men become fond of the things which serve 
them well. The affection they feel for one another seems to be 
rather mercenary. Estragon threatens to leave Vladimir on the ground 
With Pozzo if Vladimir doesn't promise to wander in the mountains 
with him. At another point Vladimir wants to leave since Pozzo is 
being unpleasant but he just doesn't quite have the nerve to go alone. 
Each man clings to the other because he is afraid of being left alone. 
They are utilitarian friends. 

Vladimir seems to feel responsible for Estragon in some cases 
but he is angered if his little favors like putting his coat over 
Estragon as he naps and giving him a carrot, aren't taken in the 
proper spirit. Vladimir offers to carry Estragon after Lucky has 
kicked him but after a moment's thought he is careful to add, "If 
necessary." 



1 Esslin, p. U- 



15 



That the two have been together for a long time wouM be hard 
to deny. They mention that they have been together for fifty or 
sixty years. But always the friendship seems to be based on one thing — 
each one's need for the other. Estragon is the only one who really 
seems to recognize Vladimir. Vladimir is the only one who really 
seems to recognize Estragon. No one else really sees them. Pozzo 
and Lucky pass by them everyday but they never remember them. The only 
place these two can find proof of their existence or identity is in 
the reflection in one another's eyes. It is true that they seem to 
separate when they leave the hill at nightfall. Estragon tells of 
being beaten "as usual." But Estragon is subject to nightmares and 
perhaps his beatings are not real. They only seem real to him because 
he doesn't have Vladimir there to remind him that he is dreaming. 

When Estragon goes to sleep in the second act Vladimir tries 

to rationalize his position: 

Was I sleeping while the others suffered? Am I sleeping 
now? To-morrow, when I wake, or think I do, what shall I say 
of today? That with Estragon my friend, at this place, until 
the fall of night I waited for Godot? That Pozzo passed, with 
his carrier and that he spoke to us? Probably. But in all that 
what truth will there be?' 1 

He cannot stand to be alone for long. He, too, needs Estragon. 

Even though they recognize one another they don't always seem to 

be communicating. Many times Estragon fails to comprehend what 

Vladimir is saying because Vladimir uses words that are not part of 

Estragon 's vocabulary. Estragon doesn't always seem to be listening 

to him either; it makes him tired. On the other hand, Vladimir 

won't listen to Estragon when he wants to tell about his nightmares. 

He will not sacrifice his personal feelings to help Estragon. 



16 



Many of their conversational exchanges are by rote. They don't even 

appear to be thinking about what they are saying. They are merely 

passing the time. They appear to mean well; they are distinctly true 

to themselves but it does not necessarily follow that they "canst 

not then be false to any man.". Their friendship is not a real source 

of security for them. It holds no answers. 

To emphasize to the audience the lack of order and the impossibility 

of order Beckett uses a specific device. He breaks the audience down 

psychologically by alternating hope with despair. Several times it 

seems that Godot has really come. Then it turns out to be Pozzo and 

Lucky or the wind in the reeds. An optimistic phrase lifts the 

spirits of all only to have the next sentence pierce the balloon and 

have all tumble back down. 

Vladimir: We are not saints, but we have kept our 
appointment. How many people can boast 
as much? 

Estragon: Billions. 

The hope that Beckett ever holds just beyond reach is not just that 

Godot will arrive; it is the hope that tomorrow will be different, 

that the last word uttered will be truth and beauty and that a final 

solution will be found for all doubts. 

The waves of alternating feeling are most apparent in the long 

speeches of Pozzo 's. After a poetic paragraph lyrically describes 

the sunset, Beckett ends it by having Pozzo say, "That's how it is on 

this bitch of an earth." Just when it seems safe to abandon all hope 

something happens to keep it barely alive. 

The tree is the only object on the set of Waiting for 
Godot . Estragon and Vladimir attempt to hide behind it; it 
will not conceal them. They attempt to imitate it; they 



17 



fail. They attempt to commit suicide with its help; it will 
not sustain them. But then, perversely and clean out of 
possibility, it breaks into the minutest signal of green life: 
"Everything is dead but the tree.' 

When things seem most hopeful a word or a signal discourages the 

waiting pair but just when they are ready to stop struggling another 

optimistic sign keeps them going. 

The fiendishness of these signals of hope lies in 
their timing. Just as the point has been reached at which 
despair, like an anesthetic, is about to sever the heart 
from its desire, comes the manifestation — and with that 
manifestation, the renewal, ^s dire as that of consciousness 
to a victim who has fainted. 

The audience is more aware of the painful consequences of the 

alternated hope and despair than is either of the two characters upon 

whom these forces are working. The audience can feel these forces 

at work upon themselves. The language used by the two men is so like 

the language used everyday by everyone to pass the time that to see 

it used in this place by these two men gives the audience a shock. 

Ionesco said, "What is comical is the usual in its pure state; nothing 

seems more surprising to me than that which is banal; the surreal is 

here, within grasp of our hands, in our everyday conversation." The 

cliches used to deal with the business of waiting for Godot are used 

by the audience as they deal with the everyday business of living. 

Vladimir: Nothing you can do about it. 

Estragon: No use struggling. 



^Josephine Jacobsen and William R. Mueller, The Testament of 
Samuel Beckett (New York, 1964), p. H7. 

2 
Jacobsen, p. M7-148. 

3 H. Hillman, "The Stage— The Absurd and the Foolish," Commonweal . 
April 6, 1962, p. 41, 



18 



Vladimir: One is what one is. 

Estragon: No use wriggling. 

Vladimir: The essential doesn't change. 

Estragon: Nothing to be done. 

The situation is so strange yet the words are so disturbingly familiar 

that the audience must laugh — or scream. 

Beckett further brings the audience into the situation by alternately 

refusing them recognition and then directing certain passages towards 

them. Early in the play Vladimir is trying to identify the place. 

"All the same... that tree.. . (turning toward the auditorium) that 

bog..." In the second act Vladimir is urging Estragon to hide in the 

audience. "There," he says, "Not a soul in sight.' Off you goi" Then 

he immediately switches his point of view by looking the audience 

directly in its collective eye and saying, "You won't, well I can 

understand that.™ The audience is delighted to be included in the 

play and reacts with enthusiasm to such lines. This brings them 

closer to the situation on the stage since the persons in the audience 

are not sure what role they are playing. 

This constant pricking of the characters and the audience is 

entirely within the "tradition of the absurd." It remains under debate 

whether there is a tradition of the absurd but VJaitina for Godot 

seems to fit the general patterns established. Mr. Hillman gives 

us one general set of patterns. 

What we must safely say is that for a play to be absurdist 
it must, minimally, exhibit the overthrow of naturalism, the 
abandonment of straightforward narrative, a lack of interest 
in psychology and an abstract or fragmented conception of 
character. . .There are certain positive characteristics of this 
type of drama. Briefly they include a pressure of literature 
and of intellectual history behind a work, a pressure of ideas 
behind the language and a fusion of the language and the action 



19 



in which neither is simply illustrative of the other but where 
speech constitutes an "action" in itself and actions are extensions 
of speech. And finally there must be a sense that experience is 
not reducible to our formulas, resists our logic and patterns 
of conscious meanings, will not divide neatly into comic and 
tragic, or light and heavy, and is, in short, absurd in a meta- 
physical and not just a behavioral sense. 

Godot is not a naturalistic play. It does not "tell a story." 

The characters are interesting but they are merely characterizations 

of characters. There are many literary references in the play which 

escape the viewer. Beckett has a wide background of literary 

knowledge on which to draw. He speaks approvingly of the practices 

2 
and convictions of Proust, Elstir, Schopenhauer, and Dostoevski. 

The play clearly depicts a total lack of faith in the "natural 
order" of things and is correctly called a tragicomedy. 

Martin Esslin is one of the leading proponents for the establish- 
ment of a tradition of the absurd. He says: 

Ultimately, a phenomena like the Theatre of the Absurd 
does not reflect despair or a return to dark irrational forces 
but expresses modern man's endeavor to come to terms with 
the world in which he lives. . . Today, when death and old age 
are increasingly concealed behind euphemisms and comforting baby 
talk, and life is threatened with being smothered in the mass 
consumption of hypnotic mechanized vulgarity, the need to con- 
front man with the reality of his situation is greater than ever. 
For the dignity of man lies in his ability to face reality in 
all its senselessness; to accept it freely, without fear, without 
illusions — and to laugh at it. 

Waiting for Godot tries to waken man by showing him other creatures 

in understandably and obviously nonsensical situations who never seem 

to come to grips with their situation. Vladimir and Estragon remain 



Hilman, p. 40. 
Jacobsen, p. 60. 
3 Esslin, p, 316. 



20 



the clowns because they cannot accept things as they are. They must 
go on waiting and hoping that Godot will come. They cannot accept 
themselves as they are. They refuse to attempt to structure their 
own world. They eternally wait for someone else to do it for them. 
Godot's arrival is merely a device to avoid facing the reality of 
the human condition. 

Beckett skillfully emphasizes the need for man to accept himself 
as he is, alone, without support by showing the devaluation of those 
things most often used by man to support himself. He shows how 
ineffective each of these things, trust in the basic goodness of man, 
science, nature, religion and friendship is by drawing for the 
audience a picture of hope and despair clearly matched — and then making 
them laugh at the whole scene. 



21 



THE ACTORS 

Discussion of Characters 
There are several different ways to tell about a character in 
a play. S character reveals himself in what he does, what he says and 
he is revealed in what others say about him. The characters of Vladimir 
and Estragon are revealed mostly through what they do and say. They 
are both too occupied with their own problems to really say much about 
each other. Pozzo and the Boy are revealed in what they do and say. 
Lucky 's character is shown by what he does and what others say about 
him. 

Estragon . This character was the slower of the two leading characters 
in the production, both mentally and physically. There are many lines 
in the play which enable one to draw this conclusion. Estragon 's 
mental slowness is shown when Vladimir initiates most of the conversation. 
Estragon is unable to contribute much to the continual conversation and 
he sometimes kills conversation completely. He just repeats himself 
when he runs out of things to say. He can't remember where he was 
yesterday and he is not sure of what he was doing then. Too much 
conversation tires him and if Vladimir would just leave him alone he 
would sleep and forget all about the situation in which he finds 
himself. When he does manage to initiate an idea he is unable to follow 
it up. He is less daring and less willing to pursue the struggle than 
his counterpart. Estragon even has trouble remembering what he is 
waiting for. 

The lack of physical coordination displayed by this character 



22 



mirrors the lack of mental coordination. The physical movements of 
Estragon are slow and rather ponderous. This effect was helped by 
the boots which were too large and clumped when he walked. The huge 
rumpled suit helped Estragon to look heavy and uncoordinated. Despite 
his bulk, Estragon is more helpless than Vladimir. He is in more need 
of reassurance and protection. If he could, Estragon would revert 
to the infant state. 

Outwardly Estragon appears to be more pessimistic of the two. 
He is willing to give up the struggle. When it seems that Godot is 
really coming he is suddenly afraid. Yet, basically he is the most 
optimistic for he is willing to go to sleep and forget it all. He 
is willing to stop waiting for Godot. He won't accept the substitute 
of a black radish for a pink one. He must expect to find a pink one 
later on somewhere — somehow. He is even willing to attempt suicide 
until it becomes too much trouble. The arrival of Godot is not the 
only solution he would accept for their problem. If the main idea of 
this play is the problem of man's condition Estragon no longer really 
cares. He is tired. 

Vladimir . Vladimir is a slightly built fellow. He is quick moving 
and nervous. He has a hernia which gives him bathroom problems and 
encourages him to be of a rather serious nature. He is outwardly 
optimistic. He cheers Estragon up, sings and gives voice to optimistic 
theories and ideals. But basically he is the pessimist. When left to 
himself Vladimir has serious doubts and for a moment truly despairs. 
He mouths pompous platitudes and fails to back them up in any way. 
He is shocked that Estragon would think of taking advantage of Pozzo's 
helplessness and then decides that it is a good policy. 



23 



Although both characters have the air of Charlie Chaplin's 
"little lost man" about them, Vladimir comes the closest to actually 
resembling this character. He is the neater of the two. His suit fits, 
his shoes fit and his hat is undented. 

Vladimir is more worried about the situation than is his friend. 
He remembers more details of the bargain with Godot and he conducts 
the interviews with the boy. He is more responsible and responsive 
to the needs of others. At times this sentiment seems superficial. 
He promises to carry Estragon — "If necessary." If it is possible to 
speak of refinement in this type of production then Vladimir is the 
more refined of the two characters. He wears his hat even though it 
hurts while Estragon would rather go barefooted than wear boots that 
hurt. Vladimir is the more learned. He uses bigger words and attempts 
more reasoning. 

Lucky . The part of Lucky is perhaps the most difficult part in the 
production. This character was highly stylized. The character must be 
established long before he even speaks a word. He is known by his 
actions and the little that Pozzo says about him. Lucky should be 
thin. He gets only bones to eat. He should be tall so that he will 
look frail and awkward. As a symbol of enslavement Lucky is really 
ageless. He should look old but not old as an ordinary person gets 
old. Since much of the time Lucky is not contributing directly to 
the scene he needs good power of concentration to stay in his own 
character all the time. Because of the nature of the character in- 
volved Lucky does not need to be in the scene, but of the scene. 
When he is not the center of attention he is sleeping and pays no 
attention to the action around him. 



24 

No special dance training was required for the dance. It was 
a grotesque dance which mainly required that the actor believe in 
his part and not feel awkward doing the dance. It would be very easy 
for an actor to ruin this whole part by feeling "silly" about doing 
it. This would make the audience uncomfortable. 
Pozzo . It is easy to picture Pozzo as a tall heavy man with a 
bombastic manner. This sort of person would make a meaningful contrast 
with the underfed Lucky. It is not always possible to find the 
physical type coupled with the acting quality desired. When it is 
necessary to make a choice this director prefers to sacrifice type 
easting. An alternate idea would be to cast a small person in the part 
of Pozzo and play up the ludicrous effect of having a small man order a 
large man around. 

Pozzo must be played on at least three different levels. On a 
very superficial level he sometimes tries to seem sensitive but 
this characteristic shows in nothing but some poetry-like phrases and 
some grand gestures. At these times he speaks lyrically. He shows a 
false faith in beauty and truth. The second character shown by Pozzo 
is an ordinary sort of person. He speaks in prose and uses common 
language. The third facet of this character is the extreme opposite 
of the first. This last change shows a very gross person with no 
insight or sentiment. He is a pessimist. 

The Boy.. This character should be as youthful looking as possible. 
He is young and scared. His main characteristic is unsureness. This 
unsureness gives him a larger than ordinary desire to please. But 
the very nature of his task makes it impossible for him to please. 
He must always impart the knowledge that Godot is not coming today. 



25 



This is not pleasant news to the two waiting men therefore the boy 
remains unsure of himself. 

General Comments . There is little need to see growth of character 
in this production. The characters come on the stage and leave it with 
little change in their characters. This is a part of the play. It 
is intended to be this way. Pozzo is the only character who changes. 
Even though he goes blind he still retains the three character levels. 
He uses the middle character more often but he is still lyrical and 
demanding in turn. 

The cast was asked to approach the realization of their characters 
in a different way than is the usual form. They should not try to 
imagine these characters as real live people who existed at some 
particular place. They should not try to know their characters as 
specific people. They were asked to be characters rather than to 
make characters . None of them were to try to realize their particular 
character in any other place except on the hill surrounded by the bog. 
Their ages were not even specific though the script indicated that 
they were about sixty years old. All members of the cast met the 
challenge of this technique with evenly distributed amounts of talent. 

Costumes 
Costumes for this show presented few problems. There was 
considerable freedom of choice in this area. Some productions have 
been done in rags and some have been done in evening dress. A middle 
ground was chosen in planning the costume plot for this play. Care 
of the costumes was simplified since Estragon, Lucky, and Vladimir 
need to look quite rumpled. The other two characters needed to only 
hang up their costumes at night. 



26 



Estragon . This character wore a black suit which was much too large 
for him. This gave him a rumpled look and emphasized the contrast 
between him and the neater Vladimir. The large pants came off easier 
in the final scene. The temperature in the theatre was above comfort 
level and since Estragon didn't have to remove his suit coat he wore a 
short sleeved white shirt. He wore huge, black, laceless combat boots 
and a wildly colored tie as well as wildly colored shorts. The outfit 
was topped off with a shabby black bowler hat. 

Vladimir . This character's suit was salt and pepper colored. It fit 
fairly well and was not as wrinkled as was Estragon 's. It was double 
breasted and extra pockets were sewn into it to accommodate all the 
radishes, turnips, string and carrots necessary. A long sleeved white 
shirt was worn under the suit coat. Vladimir carried a white pocket hand- 
kerchief, wore an ugly tie and a black bowler hat. His shoes were 
brown . 

Lucky . Lucky wore a dark blue gabardine suit and a grey shirt with a 
tie equally as bad as those worn by the other two characters. 
The pants of the suit were pulled high and fastened with suspenders 
to emphasize his height. He wore white gloves on his hands. In the 
first act he wore a black bowler hat which he left on the stage. 
He wore a gray hat in the second act. 

Pozzo. Pozzo wore yellow jodpers with a white shirt and grey riding 
jacket. He wore huge riding boots which helped him with his character- 
ization since they forced a walk which was distinctive. He wore a 
padded belt around his middle to make him look heavier. It was 
necessary to have two shirts for this character. He wore a clean shirt 
the first act and changed to a dirty one for the second act. The 



27 



brown riding boots were left off in the second act in order to 
achieve greater mobility and to protect the expensive boots. 
The Boy . In order to help him look younger the boy needed a costume 
that could be directly associated with youth. He was attired in tan 
knickers with white stockings and a yellow and blue shirt with a 
small bow tie. The pants were pulled up high and held with beige 
suspenders in an attempt to make him look younger. 

Make-up 

The characters of Vladimir and Estragon were deliberately made up 
with the idea that they should, as far as possible, resemble Charlie 
Chaplin. This decision was made with the backing of many authorities. 
The writers of The Testament of Samuel Beckett agree that, "It is the 
comedy of the circus, of vaudeville, the comedy whose essence has 
perhaps been most perfectly captured by Charlie Chaplin." Pronko 

says, "Gogo and Didi are in the sad yet amusing tradition of Charlie 

p 
Chaplin and Henri Michaux's hapless Plume." Martin Esslin further 

substantiates this in his discussion on the possibility of the 

etymology for the name "Godot." He has this to say: 

It has been suggested that Godot is a weakened form of the 
word "God," a diminutive formed on the analogy of Pierre-Pierrot, 
Charles-Chariot, with the added association of the Charlie 
Chaplin character of the little man, who is called Chariot in 
France, and whose bowler hat is worn by all four main characters 
in the play. 

The script used in this production specifically states that all four 



Jacobsen, p. 82. 

2 
Pronko, p. 31. 

3 Esslin, p. 16. 



28 

■ 

main characters wear black bouler hats. The director of this production 
deliberately wanted to capture the "little man against the world" 
quality in the characters of Vladimir and Estragon. She went to a 
number of Chaplin movies. The most impressive of Chaplin's 
characteristics outside of his actions were his large eyes set in a 
rather palid face. With this in mind she planned the make-up for 
Vladimir and Estragon. 

Both men wore a very light base, Max Factor grease paint number 
4--J-. Since some ageing was needed both characters shadowed the hollows 
of their faces with dark brown shadow. They then used brown liner 
for lines and white liner for highlights. Vladimir used the shadows 
to give his face a narrow look. He shadowed the inner corner of his 
eye lids to make his eyes look close together. Estragon worked to 
give his face a heavy appearance. He emphasized his jaw line. Both 
men used a heavy line of brown-black liquid eyeliner around their 
eyes to make them appear more prominent. This was done after then had 
powdered the rest of their make-up to set it. The eyeliner was 
particularly effective on Vladimir. Their make-up was completed by 
whiting their badly rumpled hair with white shoe polish. Estragon 
had a red spot on his leg where Lucky is supposed to have kicked him. 
Red shadow was used for this and it was sealed with collodion. 

Pozzo's make-up was planned on the basis that he was the outdoor 
type and therefore his skin would be darkened by the sun. This would 
make a nice contrast with the other two paler men. He used Max 
Factor grease paint number 8. He used brown liner to create wrinkles. 
He then used white liner for highlights.. In this case the eyeliner 
was used to give his eyes a cruel look. This was to emphasize a more 



29 

harsh character. To do this the liner was put very thinly over the 
top of the eye but drawn out to a point at the corner of the eye. 
Pozzo's hair was neatly combed and slightly grayed. 

Lucky presented a particular problem. The slightly stylized 
presentation of the character and the unnaturalistic actions required 
of him left a good deal of freedom in the interpretation of the 
make-up. He was old, he was in ill health and he didn't seem quite 
human. The make-up finally decided on was a clown white base with 
stylized shadows in gray. Because his trousers were rolled slightly 
it was necessary to cover his ankles with clown white and use gray 
shadow to make him look more gaunt. It seemed impractical to use 
make-up on his hands for he had to use them too much and the color 
would rub off on the things he carried. He wore white gloves insteak. 
There was a special make-up job to create a mean looking sore on 
Lucky' s neck. Nose putty was used and it was colored with red shadow 
and sealed with collodion. Lucky's hair, which was fairly long, was 
whitened with shoe polish and then ratted to make it bush out. It 
was sprayed heavily with hair spray to make it stay in place. 

Straight make-up was used on the boy. Care was taken to emphasize 
his already boyish face by using Max Factor grease paint number 7A, 
blue eye shadow and very rosy cheeks. 






EXPLANATION OF PLATE V 



Costume sketch for Estragon 






31 



PLATE \ 




EXPLANATION OF PLATE VI 
Costume Sketch for Vladimir 









33 



PLATE VI 




EXPLANATION OF PLATE VII 



Costume Sketch for Lucky 



35 



PLATE VII 




EXPLANATION OF PLATE VIII 
Costume Sketch for Pozzo 



37 



PLATE VIII 




EXPLANATION OF PLATE IX 
Costume Sketch for The Boy 



39 



PLATE IX 




40 



SETTING 
Description 

The setting for Waiting for Godot has unlimited possibilities 
as far as style is concerned. It could be done in many different 
styles and be as elaborate or simple as desired by the director. 
Since the production was chosen by the director partly because of the 
possibility of simplicity in stage setting there was no major decision 
about how elaborate to make the setting. It should be as simple as 
possible and still contribute to the mood of the play. 

The script calls for only two necessary elements in the stage 

setting. It is absolutely necessary to have a tree. The tree is the 

most important focal point on the stage. There are many references to 

it during the play, both directly and indirectly. In his chapter on 

Beckett found in Dionysus in Paris . Wallace Fowlie calls the tree, 

". . .a kind of gallows which invites the tramps to consider hanging 

themselves." In his book on the Avant-Garde Theatre in France, 

Leonard Pronko describes his view of the stage like this: 

The stage is bare, suggesting a stark and empty universe. 
The only hint of nature is a skeletic tree, which at once recalls 
a gallows, a cross (both instruments of torture and religious 
symbol), and the various trees of mythical literature. 

Though the script mentions that the tree is possibly a willow no one 

is ever quite sure just what it is. The range of styles could vary 



Wallace Fowlie, Dionysus in Paris . (New York, I960), p. 212. 

2 
Pronko, p. 26. 



a 



all the way from using a real willow tree to use of a tree built in 
the shape of a cross. Both of these extremes were rejected as 
not contributing to the mood desired in this production. The use of 
a real tree would suggest that the action was occurring at a real 
location rather than just anywhere or everywhere. Fowlie says, 
"The place is anyplace." It could also be no place. The use of 
a specifically stated symbol such as a cross would be deliberately 
pointing to a narrower interpretation than the director had in mind. 
One of the first speeches by Vladimir seems to show the religous 
significance possible. He says, "The last moment .. .Hope deferred 
maketh the something sick, who said that?" The basis for this speech 
is from the Bible, Proverbs 13:20. It reads, "Hope deferred maketh 
the heart sick but when the desire cometh it is a tree of life." 
Though the implications might be made to justify a very symbolic 
tree over emphasis of this portion of the interpretation would not 
contribute the desired affect in this production. 

Some interpretation of a tree somewhere between these two had to 
be found. There were two ways to obtain a tree. One could be 
built or one could be found which was already constructed or grown. 
The technical difficulties and budget ruled out constructing a frame 
for the tree and covering this frame. The director went in search 
of a tree which looked like it should not have grown. A tree was 
finally found which had branches at the desired angles. The unwanted 
branches were cut off and the whole tree cut down to size. If the 
branches had not been cut down the heigth of the tree would have 



-i 

x Fowlie, p. 212 



U2 



overpowered the stage and created an unbalanced picture. The stubs of 
the branches were sharpened to painful points. The first impulse of 
the director had been to paint the tree the same color as the floor 
and use paint to add an unrealistic look by the use of highlights and 
shadows. After the points were sharpened the white tree made such a 
nice contrast that instead of painting the tree the rest of the bark 
was stripped off. The final effect was impressionistic. Impressionism 
reduces the number of details used to create a complete picture and 
simplifies them more than they would be in real life. The tree 
finally developed could be viewed as a mangled cross, a dead tree of 
life or just an odd willow. One cast member likened it to a hand 
reaching up in a pleading gesture but ready to bend down and destroy. 

The tree was a movable piece. It was maintained in its upright 
position by means of a three inch screw drilled through a 2' by 2' 
by 1" piece of plywood and straight up into the base of the tree. 
This did not make a very stable tree for the size of the base prohibited 
use of more than one screw. After the green tree began to dry it 
split at the base and it became apparent that such an arrangement would 
not have lasted for a very long run of the show. The tree in all its 
simplicity was still the most interesting aspect of the very simple 
stage set. 

The mound was constructed by securing a step unit to the stage 
floor at the appropriate place and covering the unit with chicken 
wire. This made a completely solid unit that would bear the weight 
of two men. It was also very economical since it eliminated the 
necessity of building a new mound and the step unit was not harmed 
by the use. The wire was padded in the places most used by the two 






A3 

main characters and then the entire unit was covered with canvas 
dipped in size water. When this was dry the entire mound was painted 
the same black color as the back wall. This made a sturdy servicable 
mound that went well with the tree. 

The objects were placed one on each side of the stage so that a 
balanced picture would be presented. This arrangement allowed 
motivated moves to both sides of the stage and left space in the 
favored center stage position for the more important scenes. This 
setting did not have any elements which would attract the eye for long. 
The success of the venture would depend upon the acting and blocking. 
The main deficiency of this set was the lack of levels. There were 
five levels that could be achieved by the actors on this stage. They 
could stand on the mound, sit on the mound, stand on the floor or 
lie on the floor. When Pozzo and Lucky enter they bring with them a 
folding stool which provided another variety in the levels, fill five 
levels were used. 

Color 

The basic colors for the set were decided long before the stage 
was set. The posters were made'of brown paper and had black and 
green lettering. This gave a drab yet interesting effect that seemed 
to fit the mood of the play so these colors were used for the stage set. 
The best arrangement seemed to be to paint the floor dark brown. This 
would give the impression of a muddy, dirty hill but it would be in 
no w a y realistic. The paint used on the floor was a mixture of burnt 
sienna pigment with some whiting added to dull the tone so that 
footprints would not show up badly on the floor. This pigment was 



a 



then thoroughly mixed with alcohol. Then shellac was added to keep 
the paint from rubbing off like ordinary scene paint is likely to do. 
The first coat failed to cover and came off on the clothing of the 
actors. This was caused by the poor condition of the platforms which 
made the stage and the fact that there was not enough shellac in the 
paint mixture. The floor was painted with a better proportioned 
mixture and the second time the paint stayed on. 

The back wall had originally been painted black. To repaint it 
any other color but black would have meant that it would have to be 
changed back to black as soon as the show was over. The cost of 
repainting would have to be included in the budget. It was therefore 
extremely convenient to decide that the back wall would be best painted 
black. This did fit perfectly into the color scheme. 

The mound was painted the same color as the back wall. This 
made it stand out against the brown floor but the contrast was not 
startling or distracting. Since the paint used was flat black enamel 
it did not rub off on the clothing of the actors. 

With the brown and black in the background the white tree became 
the most prominent feature on the empty stage. At intermission three 
green leaves were hung on the lower branches of the tree by means of 
small wires. The leaves were made out of bright green paper and 
painted with yellow streaks. 

The spectacle of the setting was not supposed to be one of the 
major attractions of the production. The director was interested in 
how the audience would react to this stark presentation. The director was 
mainly interested in the ideas present in the play and in the acting 
and directing necessary to present these ideas with as few theatrical 



45 



aids as possible. The main thing required from the stage setting would 
be that it not detract from the mood of the play or distract the 
audience in any way. The final setting fit these qualifications to 
the satisfaction of the director. 






Mound 
Tree 



Set Properties 
Act I 



Act II 



Mound 

Tree 

Three leaves on the tree 



46 



EXPLANATION OF PLATE X 
Floor Plan 






48 



iP 









i 
«> 



1 




EXPLANATION OF PLATE XI 



Vladimir, Estragon and Lucky 



PLATE XI 



50 



















EXPLANATION OF PLATE XII 
Estragon and Pozzo 



5i 



PLATE XII 







EXPLANATION OF PLATE XIII 



The Boy and Vladimir 



54 



PLATE XIII 




EXPLANATION OF PLATE XIV 
Estragon and Vladimir 






PLATE XIV 



56 




57 



LIGHTING 
Description 

The first part of each act takes place near the end of the 
day. The tone desired was not one of sunshine and light. It is 
just before dusk and fairly cold. The second part of each act takes 
place after nightfall. There were nine instruments used for each 
separate scene. All the instruments for one scene were controlled by 
one dimmer. The day lights were on the right side of the light board 
while the night lights were controlled from the left side of the board. 
Each set of lights was composed of two six-inch ellipsodial reflector 
spot lights and seven six-inch Fresnels. All the Fresnels had 500 watt 
T-20 medium prefocus base lamps in them and the lekos had 500 watt T-12 
medium prefocus base lamps. All gelatin numbers were from Brigham 
Gelatin, Inc. The colors used for the day light scene were straw number 
54, steel blue number 29 and special lavender number 17. This made a 
basically cool light. The night scene was created with special 
lavender number 17, steel blue number 29 and medium blue number 36. 

One special was used at the opening of the first act. It was 
a six-inch Fresnel with a straw gelatin. It was operated independently 
from the other two sets of instruments. 

The lighting changes for this show were very simple. 8t the 
beginning of Act I a spot is used on the mound and the other day 
lights are brought in immediately. There is a cross-fade to the 
night lights near the end of the act. There is another cross-fade near 



58 



the end of the second act. Since each set of instruments could be 
controlled from one dimmer these changes were very simple. 



60 



Sound Cue Sheet 

1. Pozzo gives a horrible cry off right. 

2. Lucky drops his baggage off left. 

3. Lucky kicks the baggage around and picks it up off left. 
U. Lucky drops his baggage off left. 

5. Lucky kicks the baggage around and picks it up off left. 

6. Lucky drops baggage and Pozzo stamps feet off left. 



61 



Expenses of Production 

Play Books $ 11.80 

Royalty 50.00 

Scenery 12.43 

Physical Plant (chairs) 15.00 

Make-up. 3.46 

Costumes 

Rental 9.73 

Cleaning .65 

Props 6.24 

Advertising 

Tickets ,gp 

Posters 9.4.5 

Programs 1.34 

Collegian 5.4.0 

Sales Tax 3.83 

TOTAL EXPENSES 129.53 



62 



Waiting for Godot 
by 
Samuel Beckett 
A Tragicomedy in tvo Acts 



X 



( The house lights fade out. I During the five count 
blackout Estragon takes his place on the mound. The 
spa^jal wpnt fadas In nn Estragon as he struggles v±i 
his boot, gives up briefly and speaks his first line. 
The rest of the stage lights for day come up as he 
speaks this first line. Vladimir enters.) 

Estragon 
(giving up on his boot) ^r 

Nothing to be done. O ^ 

(Vladimir advances to extreme down right in short, 
quick "Chaplin" like steps. It is a sort of a shuffle.) 

Vladimir 
I 'm beginning to come round to that opinion . 

(He faces out to the audience . ) 

All my life I've tried to put it from me, saying, Vladimir, be 
reasonable, you haven't yet tried everything. 

(He shrugs his shoulders.) 

And I resume the struggle. , 

(He broods, musing on the struggle. He turns to Estragon 
delightedly. ) 

So there you are again. 

Estragon 
Am I? 

Vladimir 
I 'm glad to see you back. I thought you were gone forever. 

Estragon 
Me too. 



61 



Vladimir 
Together again at lastj We'll have to celebrate this. 

(He turns away from Estragon.) 
But how? 

(He turns to Estragon with outstretched arms.) 

Get up til I embrace you. 

Estragon 
(irritably) 
Not now, not now. 

(Vladimir crosses behind mound to left of Estragon.) 

Vladimir 
(coldly) 
May one inquire where his — Highness spent the night? 

Estragon 
In a ditch. 

Vladimir 
(admiringly) 
A ditch J Where? 

Estragon 
(without gesture) 
Over there. 

Vladimir 
And they didn't beat you? 

Estragon 
Beat me? Certainly they beat me. 

Vladimir 
The same lot as usual? 

Estragon 
(continuing the struggle with his boot) 
The same? I don't know. 

Vladimir 
When I think of it... all these years... but for me... where would 
you be? 

(He looks decisively at Estragon.) 

You'd be nothing more than a little heap of bones at the present 
minute, no doubt about it. 



62 



Estragon 
And what of it? 

Vladimir 
(gloomily) 
It's too much for one man. 

(He pauses, then says cheerfully.) 

On the other hand what's the good of losing heart now, that's 
what 7 say. We should have thought of it a million years ago, 
in the nineties. 

Estragon 
(indicating his boot) 
Ah stop blathering and help me off with this bloody thing. 

Vladimir 
Hand in hand from the top of the Eiffel Tower, among the first. 

(He crosses down center talking to himself.) 

We were respectable in those days. Now it's too late. They 
wouldn't even let us up. 

(He notices the struggles of Estragon.) 

What are you doing? 

Estragon 
Taking off my boot. Did that never happen to you? 

Vladimir 
(scolding) 
Boots must be taken off every day, I'm tired telling you that. 
Why don't you listen to me? 

Estragon 
(feebly) 
Help me J 

Vladimir 
It hurts? 

Estragon 
(angrily to audience) 
Hurts.' He wants to know if it hurts J 

Vladimir 
(angrily) 
No one ever suffers but you. I don't count. I'd like to hear 
what you'd say if you had what I have. 

Estragon 
It hurts? 



63 



Vladimir 
(angrily to the audience) 
Hurts! He wants to know if it hurts i 

Estragon 
(pointing to Vladimir's fly) 
You might zip it all the same. 

Vladimir 
(looking) 
True. 

(He zips his fly.) 

Never neglect the little things of life. 

Estragon 
What do you expect, you always wait til the last moment. 

Vladimir 
(musing as he moves down left) 
The last moment 

(He meditates.) 

Hope deferred maketh the something sick, who said that? 

Estragon 
(struggling with his boot) 
Why don't you help me? 

Vladimir 
Sometimes I feel it coming all the same. Then I go all peculiar. 

(He takes off his hat, peers inside it, feels about 
inside it, shakes it, puts it on again.) 

How shall I say? Relieved and at the same time appalled. 

(with emphasis) 
Ap-palled. 

(He takes off his hat again, peers inside it.) 

Funny. 

(He knocks on the crown as though to dislodge a foreign 
body, peers into it again, puts it on again.) 

Nothing to be done. 







(Estragon with a supreme effort succeeds in pulling off 
his boot. He peers inside it, feels about inside it, 
turns it upside down, shakes it, looks on the ground 
to see if anything hss fallen out, finds nothing, feels 
inside it again.) 



Well? 



Nothing 



Show 



Vladimir 



Estragon 



Vladimir 
(taking a few steps toward Estragon) 



u 



Estragon 
There's nothing to show. 

Vladimir 
Try and put it on again. 

(Estragon fans his foot with his boot) 

Estragon 
I'll air it for a bit. 

Vladimir 
There's man all over for you, blaming on his boot the faults of 
his feet. 

(He takes off his hat again, peers inside it, feels 
about inside it, knocks on the crown, blows into it, 
puts it on again.) 

This is getting alarming. 

(Silence. Vladimir deep in thought crosses down left and 
faces front. Estragon wiggles his toes. 

One of the thieves was saved. 

(Vladimir pauses. Estragon contemplates his toes.) 
It's a reasonable percentage. 

(He pauses again.) 
Gogo. 

Estragon 
What? 

■ 

Vladimir 
Suppose we repented. 



Repented what? 



65 
Estragon 



Vladimir 
Oh.... We wouldn't have to go into the details. 

Estragon 
Our being born? 

(Vladimir breaks into a hearty laugh which he immediately 
stifles, his hand pressed to his pubis, his face 
contorted.) 

Vladimir 
One daren't even laugh any more. 

Estragon 
Dreadful privation. 

Vladimir 
Merely smile. 

(He smiles suddenly from ear to ear, keeps smiling, ceases 
as suddenly.) 

It's not the same thing. Nothing to be done. 

(He pauses.) 

Gogo. 

Estragon 
(irritably) 
What is it? 

Vladimir 
Did you ever read the Bible? 

Estragon 
The Bible I must have taken a look at it. 

Vladimir 
(turning toward Estragon) 
Do you remember the Gospels? 

Estragon 
I remember the maps of the Holy Land. Coloured they were. Very 
pretty. The Dead Sea was pale blue. The very look of it made me 
thirsty. That's where we'll go, I used to say, that's where we'll 
go for our honeymoon. We'll swim. We'll be happy. 

Vladimir 
You should have been a poet. 



66 



Estragon 
I vas 

(He indicates his clothing.) 

Isn't that obvious? 

(There is a silence.) 

Vladimir 
Where was I... How 'b your foot? 

Estragon 
(looking at his foot attentively) 
Swelling visibly. 

Vladimir 
Ah yes, the two thieves. Do you remember the story? 

Estragon 
No. 

Vladimir 
Shall I tell it to you? 

Estragon 
No. 

Vladimir 
It'll pass the time. 

(He crosses behind Estragon) 

Two thieves, crucified at the same time as our Saviour. One — 

Estragon 
Our what? 

Vladimir 
Our Saviour. Two thieves. One is supposed to have been saved and 
the other damned. 



Saved from what? 


Estragon 




Hell. 


Vladimir 




I 'm going 


Estragon 





(He does not move.) 

Vladimir 
And yet... how is it — this is not boring you I hope — how is it that 
of the four Evangelists only one speaks of a thief being saved. 



. 

67 

Vladimir (continued) 
The four of them were there — or thereabouts — and only one speaks 
of a thief being saved. 

(He turns to Estragon and moves a few steps down left.) 

Come on, Gogo, return the ball, can't you, once in a while? 

Estragon 
(with exaggerated enthusiasm) 
I find this really most extraordinarily interesting. 

Vladimir 
One out of four. 

(He turns away and crosses down left.) 

Of the other three two don't mention any thieves at all and the 
third says that both of them abused him. 

Estragon 
Who? 

Vladimir 
What? 

Estragon 
What's all this about? Abused who? 

Vladimir 
The Saviour. 

Estragon 
Why? 

Vladimir 
Because he wouldn't save them. 

Estragon 
From hell? 

Vladimir 
Imbecile! From death. 

Estragon 
I thought you said from hell. 

Vladimir 
From death, from death. 

Estragon 
Well, wh 8 t of it? 

Vladimir 
Then the two of them must have been damned. 



And why not? 



68 
Estragon 



Vladimir 
But one of the four says that one of the two was saved. 

Estragon 
Well? They don't agree and that's all there is to it. 

Vladimir 
But all four were there. And only one speaks of a thief being saved. 
Why believe him rather than the others? 

(He crosses to center stage.) 

Estragon 
Who believes him? 

Vladimir 
Everybody. It's the only version they know. 

Estragon 
People are bloody ignorant apes! 

(He rises painfully, goes limping to extreme left, halts, 
gazes into distance off with his hand screening his eyes, 
turns, goes to extreme right, gazes into distance. 
Vladimir watches him, then goes and picks up the boot, 
peers into it, gets a whiff and drops it hastily.) 

Vladimir 
Pah.' 

(Estragon crosses behind mound and halts in the center of 
the stage. His back is toward the audience.) 

Estragon 
Charming spot. 

(He turns and looks at the audience.) 
Inspiring prospects. 

(He turns to Vladimir.) 

Let's go. 

Vladimir 
We can't 

• 
Estragon 
Why not? 

Vladimir 
We're waiting for Godot. 



69 



Estragon 
(despairingly) 
Ahi 

(There is a pause.) 

You're sure it was here? 

Vladimir 
What? 

(He starts to cross toward Estragon.) 

Estragon 
That we were to wait. 

Vladimir 
He said by the tree. 

(He crosses to the left of the tree and looks at it.) 

Do you see any others? 

Estragon 



What is it? 

I don't know. A willow. 

Where are the leaves? 

It must be dead. 

No more weeping. 



Vladimir 
Estragon 
Vladimir 
Estragon 



Vladimir 
Or perhaps it's not the season. 

Estragon 
Looks to me more like a bush. 

Vladimir 
A shrub. 

Estragon 
A bush. 

Vladimir 
A— 



(He crosses behind the tree to Estragon.) 



70 



Vladimir (continued) 
What are you insinuating? That we've come to the wrong place? 

Estragon 
(turning smugly toward audience) 
He should be here. 

Vladimir 
He didn't say for sure he'd come. 

Estragon 
And if he doesn't come? 

Vladimir 
We'll come back to-morrow. 

Estragon 
And then the day after to-morrow. 

Vladimir 
Possibly. 

Estragon 
And so on. 

(Vladimir starts to cross to in front of the mound.) 

Vladimir 
The point is . . . 

(Estragon cuts him off quickly.) 

Estragon 
Until he comes . 

(Vladimir turns to Estragon. ) 

Vladimir 
You're merciless. 

Estragon 
We came here yesterday. 

Vladimir 
Ah no, there you're mistaken 

Estragon 
What did we do yesterday? 

Vladimir 
What did we do yesterday? 

Estragon 
Yes. 



71 

Vladimir 
Why... 

(He turns and shuffles angrily to the front of the stage.) 

Nothing is certain when you're about. 

Estragon 
In my opinion we were here. 

Vladimir 
(looking around) 
You recognize the place? 

Estragon 
I didn't say that. 

Vladimir 
Well? 

Estragon 
That makes no difference. 

Vladimir 
All the same . . . that tr ee . . . 

(He indicates the audience.) 

That bog... 

Estragon 
You're sure it was this evening? 

Vladimir 
What? 

Estragon 
That we were to wait. 

Vladimir 
He said Saturday. 

(He hesitates.) 

I think. 

/ 

Estragon 
You think. 

Vladimir 
I must have made a note of it. 

(He fumbles in his pockets, bursting with miscellaneous 
rubbish.) 






72 

Estragon 
(very insidious) 
But what Saturday? And is it Saturday? Is it not rather Sunday? 

(He pauses to let this sink home.) 
Or Monday? 

(He pauses again.) 

Or Friday? 

Vladimir 
(looking wildly about him) 
It 's not possible; 

Estragon 
(driving the point in) 
Or Thursday? 

Vladimir 
(wildly) 
What' 11 we do? 

Estragon 
If he came yesterday and we weren't here you may be sure he won't 
come again to-day. 

Vladimir 
But you say we were here yesterday. 

Estragon 
I may be mistaken. 

(He crosses to the mound and sits down on it.) 

Let's stop talking for a minute, do you mind? 

Vladimir 
(feebly) 
All right. 

(Estragon falls asleep with his head on his knees and 
his hands locked around his ankles. Vladimir paces 
agitatedly from down right to down center twice.) 

Gogoi 

(He paces back to the center.) 
Gogol 

(He looks at Estragon and then goes over and shakes him awake.) 
Gogoi 



73 



Estragon 
(reawakened to the horror of his situation) 
I was asleep! 

(He is despairing and angry.) 

Why will you never let me sleep? 

Vladimir 
(poutingly) 
I felt lonely. 

Estragon 
I had a dream. 

Vladimir 
Don't tell me J 

Estragon 
I dreamt that — 

(Vladimir outs him off desperately.) 

Vladimir 
Don't tell mei 

Estragon 
(gesturing toward the universe) 
This one is enough for you? It's not nice of you, Didi. Who am I 
to tell my private nightmares to if I can't tell them to you? 

Vladimir 
(turning away from Estragon) 
Let them remain private. You know I can't bear that. 

Estragon 
(coldly) 
There are times when I wonder if it wouldn't be better for us to 

part . , 

Vladimir 
(still facing back wall) 
You wouldn't go far. 

Estragon 
That would be too bad, really too bad. 

(He pauses.) 
Wouldn't it, Didi, be really too bad? 

(He pauses again but there is no reply.) 
When you think of the beauty of the way. 

(Still there is no reply.) 



u 



Estragon (continued) 
And the goodness of the wayfarers. 

(He is wheedling.) 

Wouldn't it, Didi? 

Vladimir 
Calm yourself. 

Estragon 
(voluptuously) 
Calm... Calm... The English say oawm. 

(He pauses and chuckles to himself.) 

You know the story of the Englishman in the brothel? 

Vladimir 



Yes. 



(eagerly) 
Tell it to me. 



Estragon 



Vladimir 
(turning toward Estragon) 
Ah stop it. 

Estragon 
(highly amused) 
An Englishman having drunk a little more than usual proceeds to a 
brothel. The bawd asks him if he wants a fair one, a dark one or 
a red-haired one. 



(He is overcome by laughter. ) 



Go on. 
Stop it; 



Vladimir 



(Vladimir exits hurriedly. Estragon gets up and follows 
him to the door. Gestures of Estragon are like those of 
a spectator encouraging a pugilist. Vladimir enters. He 
brushes past Estragon and crosses to down left. He is 
hurt and angry. Estragon takes a step toward hiir and 
stops. He doesn't yet realize what is wrong with Vladimir.) 

Estragon 
(curiously) 
You wanted to speak to me? 

(There is silence. Estragon takes a step forward.) 



75 



Estragon (continued) 
You had something to say to me? 

(In the silence he takes another step forward.) 

Didi... 

Vladimir 
(without turning) 
I have nothing to say to you. 

Estragon 
(surprised) 
You're angry? 

(There is a silence and he takes another step forward.) 
Forgive me. 

(He takes another step forward toward Vladimir.) 

Come, Didi. 

(He puts his hand on Vladimir's shoulder and starts to 
turn him around . ) 

Give me your hand. 

(Vladimir allows himself to be turned around.) 

Embrace me! Don't be stubborn i 

(Vladimir softens and they embrace. Estragon recoils 
immediately.) 

You stink of garlic! 

Vladimir 
It's for the kidneys. 

(There is a silence.) 

What do we do now? 

Estragon 
Wait. 

Vladimir 
Yes, but while waiting. 

Estragon 
(turning toward tree) 
What about hanging ourselves? 



76 



Vladimir 
From a bough? 

(They move upstage toward the tree.) 

I wouldn't trust it. 



We can always try. 

Go ahead. 

(politely) 
After you. 

No no, you first. 

Why me? 

You're lighter than I am. 

Just so J 

I don't understand. 



Estragon 
Vladimir 
Estragon 

Vladimir 
Estragon 
Vladimir 
Estragon 
Vladimir 



Estragon 
Use your intelligence, can't you? 

(Vladimir touches his head and tries to use his intelligence.) 

Vladimir 
I remain in the dark. 

Estragon 
This is how it is. The bough 

(He indicates the bough.) 
The bough 

(He gets angry.) 
Use your head, can't you? 

(Vladimir takes off his hat and pulls his hair.) 

Vladimir 
You're my only hope. 



77 

(Vladimir puts his hat back on and gives up.) 

Estragon 
(with effort) 
Gogo light — bough not break — Gogo dead. Didi heavy — bough break — 
Didi alone. Whereas — 

Vladimir 
(crossing downstage) 
I hadn't thought of that. 

Estragon 
(coming downstage) 
If it hangs you it'll hang anything. 

Vladimir 
But am I heavier than you? 

Estragon 
So you tell me. I don't know. There's an even chance. Or nearly. 

Vladimir 
Well? What do we do? 

Estragon 
(crossing up toward mound) 
Don't let's do anything. It's safer. 

Vladimir 
Let's wait and see what he says. 

Estragon 
Who? 

Vladimir 
Godot . 

Estragon 
(crossing to upstage of mound) 
Good idea. 

Vladimir 
(moving a few steps toward Estragon) 
Let ' s wait til we know exactly how we stand . 

Estragon 
On the other hand it might be better to strike the iron before it 
freezes. 

(Vladimir crosses to behind the mound and stands beside 
Estragon . ) 

Vladimir 
I'm curious to hear what he has to offer. Then we'll take it or 
leave it. 



78 



Estragon 
(directly to Vladimir) 
What exactly did we ask him for? 

Vladimir 
(directly to Estragon) 
Were you not there? 



I can't have been listening. 

Oh... Nothing very definite. 

A kind of prayer. 

(directed out) 
Precisely. 

(directed out) 
A vague supplication. 

Exactly. 

And what did he reply? 

That he'd see. 



Estragon 



Vladimir 








Estragon 




Vladimir 





Estragon 

Vladimir 
Estragon 
Vladimir 



Estragon 
That he couldn't promise anything. 

Vladimir 
That he'd have to think it over. 



In the quiet of his home. 

Consult his family. 

His friends. 

His agents. 

His correspondents. 



Estragon 
Vladimir 
Estragon 
Vladimir 
Estragon 



79 



His books. 
His bank account. 
Before taking a decision 
It's the normal thing. 
Is it not? 



Vladimir 
Estragon 
Vladimir 
Estragon 
Vladimir 



(Estragon extends his hand.) 

Estragon 
I think it is. 

(They shake hands on it . ) 

Vladimir 
I think so too. 

(Vladimir then faces left. Estragon is content for a 
moment then he begins to have doubts.) 



CanxioHs) 



I beg your pardon? 



Estragon 

Vladimir 
Estragon 



I said, And we? 

(Vladimir turns to face him.) 

Vladimir 



I don't understand. 
Where do we come in? 
Come in? 
Take your time. 



Estragon 
Vladimir 
Estragon 



Vladimir 
Come in? On our hands and knees. 



Estragon 
As bad as that? 

Vladimir 
(scornfully) 
Your Worship wishes to assert his prerogatives? 

Estragon 
We've no rights any more? 

(Vladimir starts to laugh but stifles it as before.) 

Vladimir 
You'd make me laugh if it wasn't prohibited. 

Estragon 
We've lost our rights? 

Vladimir 
(distinctly) 

We got rid of them. 

(There is a silence.) 

Estragon 
(feebly) 
We're not tied? We're not — 

Vladimir 
Listen! 

(They huddle together and crouch down to listen. They sway 
from side to side as they strain to hear.) 

Estragon 
I hear nothing. 



Vladimir 



Hssti 



Nor I. 



(They sway to the right and Vladimir stands up straight.) 



(Estragon sways back to the left in the pattern already 
established but since Vladimir is not there he nearly falls. 
He catches himself on Vladimir.) 

Estragon 
You gave me a fright. 

Vladimir 
I thought it was he. 



81 



Estragon 
Pahi The wind in the reeds. 

Vladimir 
I could have sworn I heard shouts. 

Estragon 
And why would he shout? 

Vladimir 
At his horse 

(In the silence that follows Estragon crosses to down 
right.) 

Estragon 
(violently) 
I'm hungry i 

Vladimir 
Do you want a carrot? 

(He crosses to Estragon) 

Estragon 
Is that all there is? 

(Vladimir begins rummaging in his pockets.) 

Vladimir 
I might have some turnips. 

(He continues feeling about in all his pockets.) 

Estragon 
Give me a carrot. 

(Vladimir takes out a turnip and gives it to Estragon 

who takes a bite out of it. He turns to Vladimir angrily.) 

It's a turnip J 

Vladimir 
Oh pardon J I could have sworn it was a carrot. 

(He crosses to center, hunting through his pockets but 
finds nothing but turnips . ) 

All that's turnips. You must have eaten the last. Wait, I have it. 

(He brings out a carrot and proudly presents it to Estragon.) 
There, dear fellow. 

(Estragon wipes the carrot on his sleeve and begins to eat.) 



82 



Vladimir (continued) 
Make it last, that's the end of them. 



(chewing) 
I asked you a question. 



Ah. 

Did you reply? 
How's the carrot? 
It's a carrot. 



Estragon 

Vladimir 
Estragon 
Vladimir 
Estragon 



Vladimir 
So much the better, so much the better. What was it you wanted to 
know? 

Estragon 
I've forgotten. That's what annoys me. 

(He looks at the carrot appreciatively.) 
I'll never forget this carrot. 

(He sucks the end of it meditatively.) 

Ah yes, now I remember. 

Vladimir 
Well? 

Estrogen 
(taking a huge bite) 
We're not tied? 

Vladimir 
I don't hear a word you're saying. 

Estragon 
(swallowing part of the bite) 
I'm asking you if we're tied. 

Vladimir 
Tight? 

Estragon 
(swallowing the rest of the bite) 
Ti-ed. 



83 



How do you mean tied? 

Down. 

But to whom? By whom? 

To your man. 



Vladimir 
Estragon 
Vladimir 
Estragon 






Vladimir 
To Godot? Tied to Godot i What an ideai No question of it. 

(He has a touch of doubt . ) 

For the moment. 

Estragon 
His name is Godot? 

Vladimir 
I think so. 

Estragon 
Fancy that. 

(He looks thoughtfully at the remains of the carrot.) 

Funny, the more you eat the worse it gets. 

Vladimir 
With me it's just the opposite. 

Estragon 
In other words? 

Vladimir 
I get used to the muck as I go along. 

Estragon 
(moving toward Vladimir) 
Is that the opposite? 

(The two men stand together. One faces slightly left and 
Estrogen faces slightly right. The exchange of lines is 
rapid . ) 

Vladimir 
Question of temperament. 

Estragon 
Of character. 






at 

Vladimir 



Nothing you csn do about it. 

Estragon 



No use struggling. 
One is what one is . 
No use wriggling. 



Vladimir 



Estragon 



Vladimir 
The essential doesn't change. 

Estragon 
Nothing to be done. 

(He offers the remains of the carrot to Vladimir.) 

Like to finish it? 



(A terrible cry comes from off stage r i ght. 1 Estragon 



Oni 



drops his carrot. The two men turn away from each other, 

hesitate then turn back toward each other bumping into 

one another. They start for the left stage door. Estragon 

stops, runs back, picks up his carrot then runs to join 

Vladimir. Then he remembers his boot and he runs back 

to pick it up and rejoins Vladimir. They huddle fearfully 

by the door. 

Pozzo and Lucky enter. Pozzo drives Lucky by means 
of a rope which is long enough to let him reach the middle 
of the stage before Pozzo appears. Lucky carries a 
heavy bag, a folding stool, a picnic basket and a greatcoat. 
Pozzo carries a riding crop.) 

Pozzo 



(Pozzo snaps the crop against his huge boots. Lucky 
passes before Vladimir and Estragon and exits out the 
stage left door. When Pozzo sees the other two he 
stops and pulls on the rope.) 



Backi 



(Lucky and all his baggage can be heard falling. 



2 



Vladimir 



turns toward the door as if to go to his ssistance. 
Estr^on holds him back.) 

Vladimir 
Let me go! 

Estragon 
Stay where you arei 



85 



Be careful! He's wicked. * 

(Vladimir and Estragon turn toward Pozzo.) 

With strangers. 

Estragon 
(undertone) 

Is that him? 



Who? 

Er... 
Godot? 



Vladimir 



Estragon 
(trying to remember the name) 



Vladimir 



Yes. 

I present myself: Pozzo 

(to Estragon) 
Not at alii 

He said Godot. 

Not at alii 



Estragon 



Pozzo 
Vladimir 

Estragon 
Vladimir 



Estragon 
(timidly, to Pozzo) 
You're not Mr. Godot, Sir? 

Pozzo 
(in a terrifying voice) 
I am Pozzo! 

(There is a silence . ) 
Pozzo! Does that name mean nothing to you? 

(He waits for their answer.) 
I say does that name mean nothing to you? 

(Vladimir and Estragon look at each other questioningly.) 



Estragon 
(pretending to search) 
Bozzo. . .Bozzo. . . . 

Vladimir 
(ditto) 
Pozzo. . .Pozzo.. . 

Pozzo 
Pppozzo! 

Estragon 
AhJ Pozzo... let me see.. .Pozzo. . . 

Vladimir 
Is it Pozzo or Bozzo? 

Estragon 
Pozzo.. .no. . .1 'm afraid I... no... I don't see to... 

(Pozzo advances threateningly. Vladimir makes sure that 
Estragon is always between he and Pozzo.) 

Vladimir 
(conciliating) 
I once knew a family called Gozzo. The mother had the clap. 

Estragon 
(hastily) 
We're not from these parts, Sir. 

Pozzo 
(halting) 
You are human beings none the less. 

(He looks carefully at them.) 
As far as one can see. Of the same species as myself. 

(He chuckles.) 

Of the same species as Pozzo! Made in God's image! 

Vladimir 
Well you see — 

Pozzo 
Who is Godot? 

Estragon 
Godot? 

Pozzo 
You took me for Godot. 



87 



Vladimir 
Oh no, Sir, not for an instant, Sir. 

Pozzo 
Who is he? 

Vladimir 
Oh, he's a. ..he's a kind of acquaintance. 

Estragon 
Nothing of the kind, we hardly know him. 

Vladimir 
True. ..we don't know him very well. ..but all the same... 

Estragon 
Personally 1 wouldn't even know him if I saw him. 

Pozzo 
You took me for him 

Estragon 
(apologetically) 
That is to say. ..you understand.. .the dusk. ..the strain. . .waiting. 
I confess. ..I imagined. . .for a second... 

Pozzo 
Waiting? So you were waiting for him? 

Vladimir 
Well you see — 

Pozzo 
Here? On my land? 

Vladimir 
We didn't intend any harm. 

Estragon 
We meant well. 

Pozzo 
The road is free to all. 

Vladimir 
That's how we looked at it. 

Pozzo 
It's a disgrace. But there you are. 

Estragon 
Nothing we can do about it. 

Pozzo 
Let's say no more about it. 



88 

Pozzo (continued) 
(jerking the rope) 
Up pigi Every time he drops he falls asleep. 

(He jerks the rope again.) 
Up hog! 

(Lucky is heard getting up and picking up the hagpapa.) — : — I 

Back! 

(Pozzo jerks the rope and Lucky enters backwards.) 
Stop! 

(Lucky stops at extreme down left.) 
Tumi 

(Lucky turns toward Pozzo.) 

Gentlemen, I am happy to have met you. 

(Vladimir and Estragon are amazed at being spoken to like 
this. Pozzo jerks the rope and speaks to Lucky.) 

Closeri 

(Lucky advances three paces . ) 
StopJ 

(Lucky stops . ) 
Yes, the road seems long when one journeys all alone for... 

(He consults his watch and calculates carefully.) 

— yes... yes, six hours, that's right, six hours on end, and 
never a soul in sight. 

(He shouts at Lucky. ) 

Coati 

(Lucky puts down the bag, advances, gives the coat, goes 
back to his place and takes up the bag.) 



Hold thati 



(Pozzo holds out ohe riding crop. Lucky advances 
and takes the whip in his mouth then goes back to his 
place. Pozzo begins to put on his coat then stops.) 



89 



Pozzo (continued) 
Coat! 

(Lucky puts down bag, basket and stool, advances, helps 
Pozzo drape his coat over his back and then goes back to 
his place and takes up his burdens.) 

Touch of autumn in the air this evening. Whip J 

(Lucky advances, stoops, Pozzo snatches the riding crop 
from his mouth and Lucky goes back to his place.) 

Yes, gentlemen, I cannot go for long without the society of my 
likes even when the likeness is an imperfect one. Stool J 

(Lucky puts down bag and basket, advances, opens stool 
and puts it down . ) 



Closer! 



Back! 



(Lucky moves the stool downstage of the mound. Pozzo sits 
down.) 



Further! 



Stop! 



(Lucky starts to move back.) 
(Lucky moves to original position.) 

(Pozzo speaks to Vladimir and Estragon.) 

That is why, with your permission, I propose to dally with you a 
moment, before I venture any further. Basket! 

(Lucky advances, gives the basket and goes back to his place.) 
The fresh air stimulates the jaded appetite. 

(He takes chicken and wine from the basket.) 
Basket! 

(Lucky closes the basket and takes it back to his place.) 
Further. 

(Lucky moves one step back.) 
He stinks. Happy days! 



90 



(He begins to drink and eat loudly. Vladimir and 
Estragon begin to cautiously circle about Lucky. 
Pozzo throws the bones up left of the mound when he 
finishes with them. Lucky sags slowly, until bag and 
basket touch the ground, then he straightens and begins 
to sag again. He is sleeping on his ftet.) 

Estragon 
What ails him? 

Vladimir 
He looks tired. 

Estragon 
Why doesn't he put down his bags? 

Vladimir 
How do I know? 

(Estragon gets too close.) 

Careful .' 

Estragon 
Say something to him. 

(Vladimir has moved down left of Lucky.) 

Vladimir 
Look 

Estragon 
What? 

Vladimir 
(pointing) 
His neck! 

Estragon 
(looking at the front of his neck) 
I see nothing. 

Vladimir 
(motioning for him to come) 
Here. 

(Estragon moves to beside Vladimir.) 

Estragon 
Oh I say! 

Vladimir 
A running sore! 

Estragon 
It's the rope. 



91 



It's the rubbing. 
It's inevitable. 
It's the knot. 
It's the chafing. 



Vladimir 
Estragon 
Vladimir 
Estragon 



(They resume their inspection. Vladimir moves clockwise 
around Lucky and Estragon moves counter-clockwise. They 
meet in front and look Lucky in the face.) 



(grudgingly) 
He's not bad looking. 



(disagreeing) 
Would you say so? 

A trifle effeminate. 

Look at the slobber. 

It ' s inevitable . 

Look at the slaver. 

Perhaps he's a half-wit. 

A cretin. 



Vladimir 

Estragon 

Vladimir 
Estragon 
Vladimir 
Estragon 
Vladimir 
Estragon 



Vladimir 
(looking closely at his neck in front) 
Looks like a goiter. 



(seeing nothing) 
It's not certain. 



Estragon 



He's panting. 



(Lucky gasps for breath.) 
Vladimir 



92 



It's inevitable. 
And his eyes! 
What about them? 
Goggling out of his head. 



Estragon 
Vladimir 
Estragon 
Vladimir 



Estragon 
Looks like his last gasp to me. 

Vladimir 
It's not certain. 

(There is a pause.) 

Ask him a question. 

(Vladimir gets behind Estragon to urge him on and to keep 
something between him and Lucky.) 

Estragon 
Would that be a good thing? 

Vladimir 
What do we risk? 

Estragon 
(timidly) 
Mister. . . 

Vladimir 
(from his point of safety) 
Louder. 

/ 
Estragon 
(louder) 
Mister.. . . 

Pozzo 
Leave him in peace! Can't you see he wants to rest? Basket! 

(He begins to light his pipe. Estragon sees the chicken 
bones and begins to stare at them greedily.) 



Basket! 



(Lucky starts and moves. He puts the bottle back in the 
basket and takes all back to his place. Estragon stares 
at the bones. Pozzo again lights his pipe.) 



93 



Pozzo (continued) 
What can you expect, it's not his job. 

(He pulls at his pipe, stretches out his legs.) 

Ah! That's better. 

Estragon 
(timidly) 
Please Sir.. . 

Pozzo 
What is it, my good man? 

Estragon 
Er... you've finished with the. . .er.. .you don't need the...er... 
bones, Sir? 

Vladimir 
(scandalized) 
You couldn't have waited? 

Pozzo 
No, no, he does well to ask. Do I need the bones? No, personally 
I do not need them any more. 

(Estragon reaches for the bones.) 

But... 

(Estragon stops . ) 

But in theory the bones go to the carrier. He is therefore the 
one to ask. 

(Estragon turns toward Lucky, hesitates.) 

Go on, go on, don't be afraid, ask him, he'll tell you. 

(Estragon crosses to Lucky.) 

Estragon 
Mister... excuse me, Mister . 

Pozzo 
You're being spoken to, pig! Reply i 

(He speaks to Estragon.) 

Try him again. 

Estragon 
Excuse me, Mister, the bones. 

(Lucky looks hard at Estragon who moves back and 
continues more timidly.) 



% 



Estragon (continued) 

You von't be wanting the bones? 

Pozzo 
(in raptures) 
Mister! Reply. 1 Do you want them or don't you? 

(Lucky says nothing.) 

They're yours. 

(Estragon clumps to the bones, squats down beside them 
with his back to the audience and begins to chew on 
the bones . ) 

I don't like it. I've never known him to refuse a bone before. 
Nice business it'd be if he fell sick on me.' 

(He puffs at his pipe.) 



(exploding) 
It's a scandali 



Vladimir 



(Estragon reacts to this only momentarily. Pozzo 
is not disturbed.) 

Pozzo 
Are you alluding to anything in particular? 

Vladimir 
(outraged) 
To treat a man... like that. 

(He crosses toward Lucky.) 

I think that. . .no. . .a human being. . .no.. .it 's a scandal! 

Estragon 
(not to be outdone) 
A disgrace i 

(He resumes gnawing.) 

Pozzo 
You are severe. 

(He speaks to Vladimir who turns has back on him.) 
What age are you, if it's not a rude question? 

(Vladimir makes no reply.) 
Fifty? Sixty? 



95 



Pozzo (continued) 
(to Estragon) 
What age would you say he was? 

Estragon 
Eleven . 

Pozzo 
I am impertinent. 

(His pipe is out. He gets up.) 
I must be getting on. Thank you for your society. 

(He reflects.) 
Unless I smoke another pipe before I go. What do you say? 

(They say nothing.) 

Oh I'm only a small smoker, a very small smoker, I'm not in the 
habit of smoking two pipes one on top of the other, it makes 
my heart go pit-a-pat. 

(He pats his hand over his heart.) 
It's the nicotine, one absorbs it in spite of one's precautions. 

(He sighs.) 
You know how it is. 

(There is no reply.) 
But perhaps you don't smoke? Yes? No? It's of no importance. 

(There is more silence.) 

But how am I to sit down now, without affectation, now that I 
have risen? Without appearing to — how shall I say — without 
appearing to falter. 

(He thinks Vladimir speaks.) 
I beg your pardon? 

(Vladimir doesn't reply.) 
Perhaps you didn't speak? 

(He waits but there is no reply.) 
It's of no importance. Let me see.... 

(He reflects.) 



96 



Estragon 
Ah! That's better. 

(He stands up and puts the bones in his pocket.) 

Vladimir 
Let's go. 

Estragon 
So soon? 

Pozzo 
One moment.' Stool! 

(He points to the stool and Lucky hurries to move it 
more right.) 

More.' There! 

(The stool is still in front of the mound but it is 
about two feet further right. Pozzo sits down and 
Lucky goes back to his place.) 

Done it! 

(He fills his pipe.) 

Vladimir 
(vehemently) 
Let's go! 

Pozzo 
I hope I'm not driving you away. Wait a little longer, you'll 
never regret it. 

Estragon 
(scenting charity) 
We're in no hurry. 

(Pozzo lites his pipe.) 

Pozzo 
The second is never so sweet. 

(He takes the pipe out of his mouth and contemplates it.) 
As the first I mean. 

(He returns the pipe to his mouth.) 

But it's sweet just the same. 

Vladimir 
I'm going. 

(He doesn't move.) 



97 

Pozzo 
He can no longer endure my presence. I am perhaps not particularly 
human, but who pres? Think twice before you do anything rash. 
Suppose you go now while it is still day, for there is no denying 
it is still day, 

(They look at the sky.) 
Good . 

(They stop looking at the sky.) 
What happens in that case — 

(He takes pipe out of his mouth and examines it.) 
I 'm out — 

(He relights his pipe.) 
— in that case — in that case 

(He puffs on the pipe . ) 

What happens in that case to your appointment with this. . .Godet. . .Godot.. 

Godin anyhow you see who I mean, who has your future in his hands... 

at least your immediate future? 

Vladimir 
Who told you? 

Pozzo 
(happily) 
He speaks to me againJ If this goes on much longer we'll soon be 
old friends. 

(Estragon has been watching Lucky.) 

Estragon 
Why doesn't he put down his bags? 

Pozzo 
I too would be happy to meet him. The more people I meet the 
happier I become. From the meanest creature one departs wiser, 
richer, more conscious of one's blessings. Even you... 

(He snorts. ) 

Even you, who knows, will have added to my store. 

Estragon 
Why doesn't he put down his bags? 

Pozzo 
But that would surprise me. 



98 



Vladimir 
You're being asked a question. 

Pozzo 
(delighted) 
A question^ Who? What? A moment ago you were calling me Sir, 
in fear and trembling. Now you're asking me questions. No good 
will come of this J 

Vladimir 
(to Kstragon) 
I think he's listening. 

. 

Estragon 
(pacing back and forth behind Lucky) 
What? 

Vladimir 
You can ask him now. He's on the alert. 

Estragon 
Ask him what? 

Vladimir 
Why he doesn't put down his bags. 

Estragon 
I wonder. 

Vladimir 
Ask him, can't you? 

Pozzo 
(fearing the question will get lost) 
You want to know why he doesn't put down his bags, as you call them. 

Vladimir 
That's it. 

Pozzo 
(to Estragon) 
You are sure you agree with that? 

Estragon 
He's puffing like a walrus. 

Pozzo 
The answer is this. 

(He notices Estragon 's pacing.) 

But stay still, 1 beg of you, you're making me nervous J 

Vladimir 
(motioning to Estragon) 
Here. 



99 

Estragon 
What is it? ' 

Vladimir 
He's about to speak. 

(Estragon goes to stand beside Vladimir.) 

Pozzo 
Good. Is everybody ready? 

(He speaks directly to the audience.) 
Is everybody looking at me? 

(He notices that Lucky is not looking.) 
Will you look at me, pig! 

(Lucky looks at him.) 
Good. I am ready. Is everybody listening? Is everybody ready? 

(He looks all around and sees that Lucky is not looking.) 
Hog J . 

(Lucky looks at him.) 
I don't like talking in a vacuum. Good. Let me see. 
(He puzzles.) 

Estragon 

I 'm going. 

(He doesn't move.) 

Pozzo 
What was it exactly you wanted to know? 

Vladimir 
Why he — 

Pozzo 
(angrily) 
Don't interrupt me.' If we all speak at once we'll never get 
anywhere. What was I saying? 

Vladimir 

(helpfully) 

Why he — 

• 

Pozzo 
(loudly) 
What was I saying? 



100 



(Vladimir mimics one earring a heavy burden.) 

Estragon 
(explaining his actions) 
Bags. 

(He points at Lucky.) 

Why? Always hold. Never put down. Why? 

Pozzo 
Ah! Why couldn't you say so before? 

(Vladimir and Estragon look at one another.) 

Why he doesn't make himself comfortable? Let's try and get 
this clear. Has he not the right to? Certainly he has. It 
follows that he doesn't want to. There's reasoning for you. 
And why doesn't he want to? Gentlemen, the reason is this. 

Vladimir 
(to Estragon whose attention has been wandering) 
Make a note of this. 

Pozzo 
He wants to impress me, so that I'll keep him. 

Estragon 
What? 

Pozzo 
Perhaps I haven't got it quite right. He wants to mollify me, 
so that I'll give up the idea of parting with him. No, that's 
not exactly it either. 

Vladimir 
You want to get rid of him? 

Pozzo 
He wants to cod me, but he won't. 

Vladimir 
You want to get rid of him? 

Pozzo 
He imagines that when I see how well he carries I'll be tempted 
to keep him on in that capacity. 

Estragon 
You've had enough of him? 

Pozzo 
He imagines that when I see him indefatigable I '11 regret my 
decision. Such is his miserable scheme. As though I were short 
of slaves! Atlas, son of Jupiter! Well, that's what I think. 
Anything else? 



101 

Vladimir 
(yelling) 
You want to get rid of him? 

Pozzo 
Remark that I might just as well have been in his shoes and he 
in mine. If chance had not willed otherwise. To each one his 
due. 

Vladimir 
(fast and rolling the r's) 
You waagerrim? 

Pozzo 
(dumbfounded) 
I beg your pardon? 

Vladimir 
(carefully and deliberately) 
You want to get rid of him? 

Pozzo 
I do. But instead of driving him away as I might have done, I 
mean instead of simply kicking him out on his arse, in the goodness 
of my heart I am bringing him to the fair, where I hope to get a 
good price for him. The truth is you can't drive such creatures 
away. The best thing would be to kill them. 

(Lucky begins to whimper and weep.) 

Estragon 
He's crying! 

Pozzo 
Old dogs have more dignity. 

(He hands his handkerchief to Estragon.) 

Comfort him, since you pity him. Come on. Wipe away his tears, 
he'll feel less forsaken. 

(Estragon crosses to Lucky but still hesitates.) 

Vladimir 
(crossing after Estragon) 
Here, give it to me, I'll do it. 

(Estragon childishly refuses to give him the handkerchief 
and moves at Lucky.) 

Pozzo 
Make haste, before he stops. 

(Estragon starts to wipe Lucky's eyes and Lucky kicks him 
in the right shin. Estragon drops the hanky and staggers 



102 

Pozzo (continued) 
back behind the tree yelling with pain.) 



Hanky! 



(Lucky puts down bag and basket, picks up the hanky, 
gives it to Pozzo, goes back to his place and picks 
up his burdens.) 

Estragon 
Oh the swine! 

(He pulls up the leg of his trousers.) 

He's crippled me! 

Pozzo 
I told you he didn't like strangers. 

(Vladimir crosses back to Estragon and kneels down 
beside him.) 

Vladimir 
Show. 

(Estragon shows him his bleeding leg.) 

He's bleeding! 

Pozzo 
(comforting) 
It's a good sign. 

Estragon 
I'll never walk again! 

Vladimir 
I'll carry you. 

(This sounds like a lot of work.) 
If necessary. 

Pozzo 
He's stopped crying. You have replaced him as it were. 

(He speaks poetically.) 

The tears of the world are a constant quantity. For each one who 
begins to weep somewhere else another stops. The same is true of 
the laugh. 

(He laughs but stops abruptly.) 



103 



Pozzo (continued) 
Let us not then speak ill of our generation, it is not any 
unhappier than its predecessors. 

(He ponders.) 
Let us not speak well of it either. 

(He makes a decision.) 

Let us not speak of it at all. 

(Vladimir is trying to tie his handkerchief around 
Estragon's wound. Estragon refuses to let him.). 

It is true the population has increased. 

Vladimir 
Try and walk. 

(Estragon holds his leg with both hands and limps 
around to the mound where he sits down.) 

Pozzo 
Guess who taught me all these beautiful things. My Lucky! 

(Vladimir moves to extreme left and looks at the sky.) 

Vladimir 
Will night never come? 

Pozzo 
But for him all my thoughts, all my feelings, would have been of 
common things. Professional worries! Beauty, grace, truth of 
the first water, I knew they were all beyond me. So I took a 
knook. 

Vladimir 
(startled from his inspection of the sky) 
A knook? 

Pozzo 
That was nearly sixty years ago. 

(He consults his watch.) 

Yes, nearly sixty. You wouldn't think it to look at me, would 
you? Compared to him I look like a young man, no? 

Vladimir 
And now you turn him away? Such an old and faithful servant! 

Estragon 
(to Lucky) 
Swine ! 



104 



Vladimir 
After having sucked all the good out of him you chuck him away 
like a... like a banana skin. Really... 

Pozzo 
(very agitated) 
I can't bear it... any longer 

(He groans and clutches his head.) 

The way he goes on.. .you've no idea. ..it's terrible. . .he must go... 
I 'm going mad. . . 

(He collapses with his head in his hands.) 

1 can't bear it... any longer... 

(All is silent. Vladimir moves sympathetically to Pozzo. 
He takes off his hat and pats him on the head.) 

Vladimir 



He can't bear it. 
Any longer. 
He ' s going mad . 
It's terrible. 



Estragon 
Vladimir 
Estragon 



(Vladimir crams Pozzo 's hat back on his head and 
advances on Lucky. ) 

Vladimir 
How dare you J It's abominable J Such a good master! Crucify him 
like that; 

(He waves his arms wildly.) 

After so many years! Really! 

Pozzo 
(sobbing) 
He used to be so kind. ..so helpful. . .and entertaining. . .my good 
angel... and now he's killing me. 

Estragon 
(to Vladimir) 
Does he want to replace him? 

Vladimir 
What? 



105 



Estragon 
Does he want someone to take his place or not? 



I don't think so. 

What? 

I don 't know. 

Ask him. 



Vladimir 
Estragon 
Vladimir 
Estragon 



(Vladimir starts toward Fozzo.) 
Vladimir 



Do you. 



Pozzo 
(completely recovered) 
Gentlemen, I don't know what came over me. Forgive me. Forget 
all I said. I don't remember exactly what it was but you may be 
sure that there wasn't a word of truth in it. Do I look like a 
man that cnn be made to suffer? Frankly? 

(He rummages in his pockets.) 

What have I done with my pipe? 

Vladimir 
Charming evening we're having. 

(Estragon stands.) 

Estragon 
Unforgettable. 

Vladimir 
And it's not over. 

Estragon 
Apparently not. 

(Vladimir begins to feel the call of nature. He twists 
and sqirms.) 

Vladimir 
It's only beginning. 

Estragon 
It's awful. 

Vladimir 
Worse than the pantomime. 



106 



Estragon 
The circus. 

Vladimir 
The music-hall. 

Estragon 
The circus. 

Pozzo 
What can I have done with that briar? 

Estragon 
(chuckling) 
He's a scream. He's lost his dudeen. 

Vladimir 
(hurrying toward the door) 
I'll be back 

Estragon 
End of the corridor, on the left. 

Vladimir 
Keep my seat. 



(He exits right stage . ) 






Pozzo 

(on the point of tears) 
I've lost my Kapp and Peterson' 

Estragon 
(laughing) 
He'll be the death of me. 

(He goes to the door and looks out.) 

Pozzo 
You didn't see by any chance — 

(He misses Vladimir.) 

Oh! He's gonei Without saying goodbye! How could he! He might 
have waited! 

Estragon 
He would have burst. 



Pozzo 
(understanding) 
Oh! Well then of course in that case... 

Estragon 
Come here. 







107 


What for? 




Pozzo 


You'll see. 




Estragon 


You want me to get up? 


Pozzo 


Quick! 


■ 


Estragon 


(Pozzo gets up and joins Estragon at the door. They 
both look off toward the left . Estragon points . ) 


Look! 






Oh I say! 




Pozzo 


It's all over. 




Estragon 


(He claps. 


,) 




Encore, Encore. 






(Vladimir enters. He is mad and unhappy. He crosses 
down right and paces back and forth across the front of 
the stage from down right to center and back again.) 


He's not pleased. 




Pozzo 


(to Vladimir) 
You missed a treat. Pity. 


Estragon 


(Vladimir 


stops 


extreme down right and looks out . ) 


He subsides. 




Pozzo 


(He looks 


around 


i.) 


Indeed all subsides. 


A great calm descends. Listen! Pan sleeps. 


Will night never come? 


Vladimir 


(All three 


i look 


at the sky.) 


You don't feel like 


Pozzo 
going until it does? 



Well you see- 



I 

108 
Estragon 



Pozzo 
(moving back toward his stool) 
Why it's very natural, very natural. I myself in your situation, 
if I had an appointment with a Godin. . .Godet.. .Godot. . .anyhow 
you see who I mean, I'd wait till it was black night before I 
gave up. 

(He looks at the stool.) 

I'd very much like to sit down, but I don't quite know how to go 
about it. 

■ 
Estragon 
Could I be of any help? 

Pozzo 
If you asked me perhaps. 

Estragon 
What? 

Pozzo 
If you asked me to sit down. 

Estragon 
Would that be a help? 

Pozzo 
I fancy so. 

Estragon 
Here we go. Be seated, Sir, I beg of you. 

Pozzo 
No no, I wouldn't think of it.' 

(Estragon shrugs his shoulders and starts to walk away. 
Pozzo stops him with a whispered aside.) 

Ask me again. 

Estragon 
Come come, take a seat I beseech you, you'll get pneumonia. 

Pozzo 
(shocked) 
You really think so? 

Estragon • 
Why it's absolutely certain. 



109 

Pozzo 
No doubt you are right. 

(He seats himself grandly.) 
Done it again! Thank you, dear fellow. 

(He consults his watch.) 

But I must really be getting along, if I am to observe my schedule. 

Vladimir 
(looking out) 
Time has stopped. 

Pozzo 
Don't you believe it, Sir, don't you believe it. 

(He puts his watch back in his pocket.) 

Whatever you like, but not that. 

Estragon 
(to Pozzo) 
Everything seems black to him to-day. 

Pozzo 
Except the firmament. 

(He laughs suddenly and loudly. He quits immediately 
when he sees Estragon 's look of amazement. 

But I see what it is. 

(Estragon picks up his boot and Vladimir takes off his 
hat and begins to examine it.) 

You are not from these parts, you don't know what our twilights 
can do. Shall I tell you? 

(There is no answer. Both men are concentrating on the 
objects in their hands.) 

I can't refuse you. A little attention, if you please. 

(Pozzo cracks the riding crop on the floor feebly.) 

What's the matter with this whip? 

(He gets up and bangs the whip loudly against the floor. 
Lucky jumps. Vladimir's hat, Estragon's boot, Lucky's 
hat, fall to the ground. Pozzo throws down the crop. 

Worn out, this whip, what was I saying? ■ 



110 



Vladimir 
(to Estragon) / 

Let's go. 

Estragon 
(to Pozzo) 
But take the weight off your feet, I implore you, you'll catch 
your death. 

Pozzo 
True. 

(He sits down.) 

What is your name? 

Estragon 
Adam. 

Pozzo 
(who hasn't listened) 
Ah yesi The night. 

(He looks about.) 

But be a little more attentive, for pity's sake, otherwise we'll 
never get anywhere. 

(He looks at the sky.) 

Look! 

(All look at the sky except Lucky who is dozing off 
again. Pozzo jerks the rope.) 

Will you look at the sky, pig J 

(Lucky looks at the sky.) 
Good, that's enough. 

(Lucky stops looking at the sky.) 

What is there so extraordinary about it? Qua sky. It is pale 
and luminous like any sky at this hour of the day. In these 
latitudes. When the weather is fine. 

(He speaks lyrically.) 
An hour ago, roughly, after having poured forth even since... 

(He speaks prosaically.) 
Say ten o'clock in the morning... 

(He speaks lyrically.) 



Ill 

Pozzo (continued) 

Tirelessly torrents of red and white light it begins to lose its 
eifulgence, to grov pale... 

(He gestures with both hands lapsing by stages.) 
Pale, ever a little paler, a little paler until... 

(He makes a dramatic pause and uses an ample gesture of 
both hands flung wide apart.) 

PppfffJ Finished: It comes to rest. But— 

(He makes a gesture of admonition.) 

But hehind this veil of gentleness and peace night is charging 
and will burst upon us . . . 

(He snaps his fingers.) 
Pop! Like that) 

(His inspiration leaves him.) 
Just when we least expect it. 

(There is a silence. He continues gloomily.) 
That's how it is on this bitch of an earth. 

(There is silence.) 

Estragon 



So long as one knows. 
One can bide one's time. 
One knows what to expect 
No further need to worry 
Simply wait. 
We're used to it. 



Vladimir 

Estragon 

Vladimir 

Estragon 

Vladimir 

(He picks up his hat, peers inside it, shakes it, 
puts it on.) ' 

How did you find me? 



puts 

Pozzo 





112 


(Vladimir and Estragon look blankly at Pozzo.) 


Pozzo 
Good? Fair? Middling? Poor? Positively bad? 


(His expression varies with the words so that he is 
nearly crying on the last one.) 


Vladimir 
(first to understand) 
Oh very good, very very good. 


Pozzo 
(to Estragon) 
And you Sir? 


Estragon 
Oh tray bong, tray tray tray bong. 


Pozzo 
(fervently) 
Bless you, gentlemen, bless you J I have such need of encouragement! 


(He pauses.) 


I weakened a little toward the end, you didn't notice? 


Vladimir 
Oh perhaps just a teeny weeny little bit. 


Estragon 
I thought it was intentional. 


Pozzo 
You see my memory is defective. 


Estragon 
In the meantime nothing happens. 


Pozzo 
You find it tedious? 


Estragon 
Somewhat . 


Pozzo 

(to Vladimir) 
And you, Sir? 


Vladimir 
I've been better entertained. 


(Pozzo struggles inwardly.) 



113 



Pozzo 
Gentlemen, you have been... civil to me. 

Estragon 
Not at all J 

Vladimir 
What an idea.' 

Pozzo 
Yes yes, you have been correct. So that I ask myself is there 
anything I can do in my turn for these honest fellows who are having 
such a dull, dull time. 

(Estragon stands up eagerly.) 

Estragon 
Even ten francs would be a help. 

Vladimi r 
(outraged) 
We are not beggers! 

Pozzo 
Is there anything I can do, that's what I ask myself, to cheer 
them up? I have given them bones, I have talked to them about this 
and that, I have explained the twilight, admittedly. But is it 
enough, that's what tortures me, is it enough? 

Estragon 
(hopefully) 
Even five. 

Vladimir 
(to Estragon, indignantly) 
That's enough! 

Estragon 
(proudly) 
I couldn't accept less. 

Pozzo 
(thinking Vladimir was talking to him) 
Is it enough? No doubt. But I am liberal. It's my nature. 
This evening. So much the worse for me. For I shall suffer, 
no doubt about that. What do you prefer? Shall we have him 
dance, or sing, or recite, or think, or — 



Who? 

Pozzo 
Whoi You know how to think, you two? 

Vladimir 
He thinks? 



xu 

Pozzo 
Certainly. Aloud. He even used to think very prettily once, I 
could listen to him for hours. Now... 

(He shudders.) 

So much the worse for me. Well, would you like him to think 
something for us? 

Estragon 
I'd rather he'd dance, it'd be more fun. 

Pozzo 
Not necessarily. 

Estragon 
(wheedling toward Vladimir) 
Wouldn't it Didi, be more fun? 

Vladimir 
I'd like well to hear him think. 

Estragon 
Perhaps he could dance first and think afterwards, if it isn't 
too much to ask him. 

Vladimir 

(to Pozzo) 

Would that be possible? 
/ 

Pozzo 
By all means, nothing simpler. 

(He chuckles.) 

It's the natural order. 

, Vladimir 
Then let him dance. 

(Nothing happens.) 

Pozzo 
(to Lucky) 
Do you hear, hog? 

Estragon 
He never refuses? 

Pozzo 
(with a sadistic smile) 
He refused once. Dance, misery J 

(Lucky puts down burdens and advances to center stage 
where he faces away from audience. Dance ends facing audience.) 



115 
Estragon 



Is that all? 

Pozzo 
Encore 1 

(Lucky executes the same movements only more frantically. 
He stops panting.) 

Estragon 
Pooh! Pooh! I'd do as well myself. 

(He attempts to imitate Lucky, almost falls.) 

With a little practice. 

Pozzo 
He used to dance the farandole, the fling, the brawl, the jig, 
the fandango and even the hornpipe. He capered. For joy. 
Now that's the best he can do. Do you know what he calls it? 

Estragon 
The Scapegoat 's Agony. 

Vladimir 
The Hard Stool. 

Pozzo 
The Net. He thinks he's entangled in a net. 

Vladimir 
(squirming like Lucky) 
There's something about it... / 

(Lucky starts to return to his burdens.) 

Woaa! 

(Lucky freezes.) 

Estragon 
Tell us about the time he refused. 

Pozzo 
With pleasure, with pleasure. 

(He fumbles in his pockets.) 
Wait. What have I done with my spray? Well now isn't that... 

(He gasps.) 
I can't find my pulverizer! 



(faintly) 
My left lung is very week J 



116 
Estragon 



(He coughs feebly then continues in ringing tones.) 
But my right lung is as sound as a bell J 

Pozzo 

(normal voice) 
No matter i What was I saying. 

(He ponders.) 
Wait. 

(He ponders more.) 
Well now isn't that... Help me! 



Wait! 



Wait! 



Wait! 



Estragon 
(taking off his hat) 



Vladimir 
(taking off his hat) 



Pozzo 
(taking off his hat) 



Ah! 

He has it. 



Estragon 
(triumphantly) 



Vladimir 



Pozzo 
Well? 

Estragon 
Why doesn't he put down his bags? 

Vladimir 
(turning away in disgust) 
Rubbish! 

Pozzo 
(confused) 
Are you sure? 

Vladimir 
(turning back) 
Damn it haven't you already told us? 



117 

Pozzo 
I 've already told you? 

Estragon 
He's already told us? 

Vladimir 
(pointing at Lucky) 
Anyway he has put them down. 

Estragon 
(looking at Lucky) 
So he has. And what of it? 

Vladimir 
Since he has put down his bags it is impossible we should ask 
why he does not do so. 

Pozzo 
Stoutly reasoned! 



And why has he put 


Estragon 
them down? 


Answer us that 


Pozzo 


In order to dance. 


Vladimir 


True! 


Estragon 




Pozzo 



True! 

(They all put on their hats.) 
Estragon 



istrago 
(crossing upstage right) 
Nothing happens, nobody comes, nobody goes, it's awful! 



Vladimir 
(to Pozzo) 
Tell him to think. 

Pozzo 
Give him his hat. 

Vladimir 
His hat? 

Pozzo 

He can't think without his hat. 







118 


Vladimir 
(to Estragon) 
Give him his hat. 




Me! 


Estragon 
After what he did to me! Never! 




I'll 


Vladimir 
(reluctantly) 
give it to him. 

(He doesn ' t move . ) 




Tell 


Estragon 
(to Pozzo) 
him to go and fetch it. 




It's 


Pozzo 
better to give it to him. 




I'll 


Vladimir 
give it to him. 






(He crosses to Lucky carefully walking behind him to 
pick up the hat. He holds it toward Lucky who does 
not move.) 


Pozzo 
You must put it on his head. 






(Estragon has advanced toward 
defensively in his hand.) 


Lucky with his boot held 


Tell 


Estragon 
(to Pozzo) 
him to take it. 




It's 


Pozzo 
better to put it on his head. 




I'll 


Vladimir 
put it on his head. 






(He approaches Lucky from behind and jams the hat on his 
head. He jumps back. Lucky does not move.) 


What' 


Estragon 
s he waiting for? 


■ 


Stand 


Pozzo 
back! 


■ 




(Vladimir and Estragon move to 
and sit down to watch the show 


the left edge of the stage 


Think 


Pigj 





119 



Stop J 



Forward ! 



Stop J 



Think! 



(Lucky begins to dance wildly.) 
Pozzo 

(Lucky stops.) 
(Lucky advances.) 
(Lucky stops.) 



Lucky 
On the other hand with regard to — 

(His voice is rusty from disuse.) 

Pozzo 



Stop. 1 



Turni 



Back! 



Stop! 



Think! 



(Lucky stops.) 
(Lucky turns toward the audience in front.) 
(Lucky backs up a little further than center stage.) 
(Lucky stops, weaving.) 



Lucky 
Given the existence as uttered forth in the public works of 
Puncher and Wattmann of a personal God quaquaquaqua with white 
beard quauqauqauqa outside time without extension who from the 
heights of divine apathia divine athambia divine aphasia loves 
us dearly with some exceptions for reasons unknown but time will 
tell... 

(Estragon and Vladimir are listening attentively. Pozzc 
is dejected and disgusted.) - 

And suffers like the divine Miranda with those who for reasons 
unknown but time will tell are plunged in torment plunged in fire 



120 



Lucky (continued) 
whose fire flames if that continues and who can doubt it will 
fire the firmament that is to say blast hell to heaven so blue 
still and calm so calm with a calm which even though intermittent 
is better than nothing but not so fast and considering what is 
more that as a result of the labors left unfinished crowned by the 
Aeacacacademy of Anthropopopometry of Essy-in-Possy of Testew 
and Cunard it is established beyond all doubt all other doubt 
that that which clings to the labors of men that as a result of the 
labors unfinished of Testew and Cunard it is established as 
hereinafter but not so fast for reasons unknown that as a result of 
the public works of Puncher and Wattmann it is established beyond 
all doubt that in view of the labors of Fartov and Belcher left 
unfinished for reasons unknown of Testew and Cunard left unfinished 
it is established what many deny that man in Possy of Testew and 
Cunard that man in Essy that man in short that man in brief in 
spite of the strides of alimentation and defecation wastes and 
pines.. . . 

(Vladimir and Estragon begin. to protest, Pozzo's 
sufferings increase.) 

wastes and pines and concurrently simultaneously what is more for 
reasons unknown in spite of the strides of physical culture the 
practice of sports such as tennis football running cycling... 

(Vladimir and Estragon are attentive again. Pozzo is 
more and more agitated and groaning.) 

Swimming flying floating riding gliding conating camogie skating 
tennis of all kinds dying flying sports of all sorts autumn 
summer winter winter tennis of all kinds hockey of all sorts 
penicilline and succedanea in a word I resume flying gliding 
golf over nine and eighteen holes tennis of all sorts in a word 
for reasons unknown in Feckham Peckham Fulham Clapham namely 
concurrently simultaneously what is more for reasons unknown but 
time will tell fades away I resume Fulham Clapham in a word the 
dead loss per head since the death of Bishop Berkeley being to the 
tune of one inch four ounce per head approximately by and large 
more or less to the nearest decimal good measure round figures 
stark naked in the stockinged feet in Connemara in a word for 
reasons unknown no matter what matter the facts are there and 
considering what is more much more grave that in the light of the 
labors lost of Steinweg and Peterman it appears what is more 
much more grave that in the light the light the light of the 
labors lost of Steinweg and Peterman that in the plains in the 
mountains by the seas by the rivers running water running fire 
the air is the same and then the earth namely the air and then the 
earth in the great cold the great dark the air and the earth 
abode of stones in the great cold... 

(Vladimir and Estragon moan.) 

Alas alas in the year of their Lord six hundred and something 
the air the earth the sea the earth abode of stones in the 



121 



Lucky (continued) 
great deeps the great cold on sea on land and in the air I 
resume for reasons unknown in spite of the tennis the facts 
are there but time will tell I resume ales alas on on in short 
in fine on on abode of stones who can doubt it I resume but rot so 
fast I resume the skull fading fading fading... 

(Vladimir, Pozzo, and Estragon whistle, shout and 
try to cover their ears.) 

And concurrently simultaneously what is more for reasons unknown 
in spite of the tennis on on the beard the flames the tears the 
stones so blue so calm alas alas on on the skull the skull the 
skull the skull in Connemara in spite of the tennis the labors 
abandoned left unfinished graver still abode of stones in a word I 
resume alas alas abandoned unfinished... 

(Lucky tugs on his rope, Vladimir and Estragon get to 
their feet and advance on Lucky.) 

The skull the skull in Connemara in spite of the tennis the skull 
alas the stones Cunard... 

(All are on their feet. Vladimir and Estragon begin to 
pull on Lucky.- Lucky staggers and shouts his text. 
He goes down but is still shouting. 



His hat J 



Pozzo 



Lucky 
Tennis... the stones... so calm. ..Cunard... . 

(Vladimir seizes Lucky 's hat.) 

Lucky 

(squacking plaintivly) 
Unfinished... 

(Lucky freezes with his arms outstretched half lying 
half sitting on the floor. Vladimir holds his hat.) 

Pozzo 
Give me thati 

(He snatches the hat from Vladimir and slams it down on 
the edge of the stage. 

There's an end to his thinking. 

Vladimir 
But will he be able to walk? 

Pozzo 

Walk or crawl J 



122 



(Pozzo kicks Lucky who doesn't move.) 
Pozzo 



Up pig.' 

Perhaps he's dead. 
You'll kill him. 
Up scum! 



Estragon 
Vladimir 
Pozzo 



(He jerks the rope.) 

Help me J 

Vladimir 
How? 

Pozzo 
Eaise him up J 

(Vladimir and Estragon hoist Lucky to his feet, support 
him an instant, then let him go. He falls. 

Estragon 
He's doing it on purpose! 

Pozzo 
You must hold him. Come on, come on, raise him up. 

(They lift Lucky again. He falls again.) 

Estragon 
To hell with him.' 

Vladimir 
Come on, once more. 

Estragon 
What does he take us for? 

(They raise Lucky, hold him up.) 

Pozzo 
Don't let him go! Don't move! 

(Pozzo crosses in front of them to left stage and gets 
the bag and basket. He puts the bag in Lucky 's hand. 
Lucky drops it. • 

Hold him tight. Don't let him go. 



123 



(Pozzo again puts the bag in Lucky's hand. This time 
he holds it.) 

Pozzo 

Hold him tight: 

(He puts the basket in Luoky's other hand.) 

Nov J You can let him go. 

(Vladimir and Estragon move back from Lucky who 
totters, reels and sags but succeeds in remaining 
on his feet, bag and basket in his hands. Pozzo 
steps back and snaps the crop against his boot.) 

Forward I 

(Lucky staggers forward two paces.) 
Back! 

(Lucky totters back.) 
Turn. 1 

(Lucky turns toward left.) 
Forward i 

(Lucky staggers forward three steps.) 
Stop! 

(Lucky stops.) 
Done it! He can walk. 

(He turns to Vladimir and Estragon.) 
Thank you, gentlemen, and let me... 

(He fumbles in his pockets. ) 
Let me wish you... wish you... what have I done with my watch? 

(He continues looking.) 
A genuine half -hunter, gentlemen, with deadbeat escapement! 

(He is sobbing.) 
Twas my granpa gave it to me! - 

(They help him look. Vladimir looks under Lucky 's hat.) 
Well now isn't that just — 



124 

Vladimir 



Perhaps it's in your pocket. 

Pozzo 



Wait! 



(He doubles up in an attempt to apply his ear to his 
stomach, listens. 

I hear nothing. 

(He beckons to them to approach. Vladimir goes and listens 
on his right side and Estragon listens on the left side.) 

Surely one should hear the tick-tick. 

Vladimir 
Silence! 

(All listen.) 

Estragon 
I hear something. 

Pozzo 

Where? 

(Estragon points to the heart region.) 

Vladimir 
It's the heart. 

Pozzo 
(disappointed) 
Damnation! 

Vladimir 
Silence! 

(Pozzo begins to sniff.) 

Estragon 
Perhaps it has stopped. 

(Pozzo pushes them away from him.) 

Pozzo 
Which of you smells so bad? 

Estragon 
He has stinking breath and I have stinking feet. 

(Pozzo begins to gather up the rope and crop.) 

Pozzo 

I must go. 









125 


Estragon 
And your half-hunter? 






Pozzo 
I must have left it nt the manor. 








(In the silence they all look at 


one another.) 




Estragon 
Then adieu. 






Adieu. 


Pozzo 

(to Estragon) 






Adieu. 


Vladimir 






Adieu. 


Pozzo 
(to Vladimir) 

(No one moves.) 






Adieu. 


Vladimir 






Adieu. 


Pozzo 






Adieu. 


Estragon 
(There is a silence.) 






And thank 


Pozzo 
you. 






Thank you 


Vladimir 






Pozzo 
(to Vladimir) 
Not at all. 






Yes yes. 


Estragon 






No no. 


Pozzo 
(to Estragon) 






Yes yes. 


Vladimir 











126 


No no. 


Estragon 
(tired of it all) 

(There is silence.) 




I don't 


Pozzo 
seem to be able to depart. 




Such is 


Estragon 
life. 

(Pozzo begins backing toward the right exit, playing 
out the rope as he goes . ) 




Vladimir 
(in alarm) 
You're going the wrong way. 




Pozzo 
I need a running start. 






(He comes to the end of the rope and stops . ) 




Stand bock: 






(Both men back up a pace or two.) 




On! On, 


i 

(Pozzo cracks the riding crop against his boot.) 




On! 


Estragon 




On! 


Vladimir 

(Lucky moves off the stage and Pozzo moves across the 
stage.) 




Faster! 


Pozzo 
On! On! 

(Vladimir and Estragon follow after him. Just as he is 
nearly off he sees the stool.) 




Stool! 


(The rope tightens and Luckv is heard falling Hnup, 
Vladimir fetches the stool. He starts to give it to 
Pozzo who points off at Lucky. Vladimir takes the 
stool to Lucky and returns.) 


_JL 


Adieu! 







127 

Vladimir 
(taking off his hat and waving it) 
Adieu i Adieu! 

Estragon 
(taking off his hat and vaving it) 
AdieuJ Adieu.' 

Pozzo 

Dpi Pig! 

( Lucky is heard getting up and Pozzo moves off stage Q 

shouting. 1 

Faster! On! Adieu! Pig! Yip! Adieu! 

(Vladimir and Estragon look sadly after them then they 
slowly put their hats back on and return to the business 
of waiting. They are both in center stage with Estragon 
on the right and Vladimir onttie left.) 

Vladimir 

That passed the time. 

Estragon 
It would have passed in any case. * 

Vladimir 
Yes, but not so rapidly. 

(There is a pause.) 

Estragon 



What do we do now? 
I don't know. 
Let's go. 
We can 't. 
Why not? 

We're waiting for Godot, 
(despairingly) 



Vladimir 
Estragon 
Vladimir 
Estragon 
Vladimir 
Estragon 



Ah! 

(There is silence.) 



128 



Vladimir 
How they've changed! 

Estragon 
Who? 

Vladimir 
Those two. 

Estragon 
That's the idea, let's make a little conversation. 

Vladimir 
Haven't they? 

Estragon 
What? 

Vladimir 
Changed . 

Estragon 
Very likely. They all change. Only we can't. 

Vladimir 
Likelyi It's certain. Didn't you see them? 

Estragon 
I suppose I did. But I don't know them. 

Vladimir 
Yes you do know them. 

/ 

Estragon 
No I don't know them. 

Vladimir 
We know them, I tell you. You forget everything. 

(He pauses then speaks to himself.) 

Unless they're not the same... 

Estragon 
Why didn 't they recognize us then? 

Vladimir 
That means nothing. I too pretended not to recognize them. And 
then nobody ever recognizes us. 

Estragon 
(starting to move toward the tree) 
Forget it. What we need— owi 



(His shoes hurt him again.) 



129 
Vladimir 



(to himself) 
Unless they're not the same... 

Estragon 
DidiJ It's the other foot.' 

(He starts to hobble toward the mound.) 

Vladimir 
Unless they 're not the same . . . 

Boy 
(from off right) 
Misteri 

(Estragon stops and forgets about his feet.) 

Estragon 
Off we go again. 

Vladimir 
Approach, my child. 

(The Boy enters and walks timidly downstage.) 

Boy 
(hesitantly) 
Mister Albert.. .? 



Yes. 

What do you want? 

(kindly) 
Approach ! 



Vladimir 
Estragon 
Vladimir 



(The Boy hesitates. He is afraid of Estragon who 
glowers at him.) 

Estragon 
(forcibly) 
Approach when you're told, can't you? 

(The Boy advances toward the center of the stage 
three or four steps.) 

Vladimir 
What is it? 

Boy 

Mr. Godot... 



130 

Vladimir 
Obviously. . . 

(There is a pause.) 

Approach . 

Estragon 
(violently) 
Will you approach] 

(The Boy advances to center stage. Estragon moves up 
on the right side of him and Vladimir is on his left.) 



What kept you so late? 

Vladimir 
You have a message from Mr. Godot? 



Yes Sir. 


Boy 


Well, what is it? 


Vladimir 




Estragon 



What kept you so late? 

(The boy is confused by the questions. 

Vladimir 
(to Estragon) 
Let him alone. 

Estragon 
(violently) 
You let me alone. 

(He speaks to the Boy.) 

Do you know what time it is? 

Boy 

It's not my fault, Sir. 

Estragon 
And whose is it? Mine? 

Boy 
I was afraid, Sir. 

Estragon 
Afraid of what? Of us? 

(The Boy doesn't answer.) 



131 



Estragon (continued) 
Answer me J 

Vladimir 
(helping the Boy out) 
I know what it is, he was afraid of the others. 

Estragon 
How long have you been here? 



A good while, Sir. 




Boy 


You were afraid of the 


Vladimir 
whip? 


(grateful 
Yes Sir. 


to 


Boy 

find someone who understands) 


The roars? 




Vladimir 


Yes Sir. 




Boy 


The two big men. 




Vladimi r 


(eagerly) 
Yes Sir. 




Boy 


Do you know them? 




Vladimir 



Boy 
(almost saying "Yes" out of habit) 
No Sir. 

Vladimir 
Are you a native of these parts? 

(The boy doesn't answer.) 

Do you belong to these parts? 

Boy 
Yes Sir. 

Estragon 
That's all a pack of lies. 

(He grabs the boy's shoulder and starts to shake him.) 



132 



Estragon (continued) 
Tell us the truth J 

Boy 
(protesting frantically) 
But it is the truth, Sir! 

Vladimir 
(angrily) 
Will you let him alone! What's the matter with you? 

(Estragon moves down right covering his face with his 
hands. The other two watch him. When he looks he is 
almost crying.) 

What's the matter with you? 

Estragon 
(pouting) 
I'm unhappy. 

Vladimir 
(sarcastically) 
Not really J Since when? 

Estragon 
I'd forgotten. 

Vladimir 
Extraordinary the tricks that memory plays i 

(Estragon limps to the mound, sits down and begins to 

take off his boot. He ignores the rest of the conversation. 

Vladimir speaks to the Boy.) 

Well? 

Boy 
Mr. Godot— 

Vladimir 
I've seen you before, haven't I? 

Boy 
I don't know, Sir. 

(He doesn't think so.) 

Vladimir 
You don't know me? 

Boy ^ 
No Sir. 

Vladimir 
It wasn't you came yesterday? 







133 


No Sir. 


Boy 




This is your first time? 


Vladimir 




Yes Sir. 


Boy 




(In the silence Vladimir valks behind the Boy to 
get on the right side of him.) 




Words words. Speak. 


Vladimir 




Boy 

(hurridly) 
Mr. Godot told me to tell you he won't oome this evening, but 
surely to-morrow. 




Is that all? 


Vladimir 




Yes Sir. 


Boy 




(There is silence as Vladimir moves to the left of the 
Boy.) 




You work for Mr. Godot? 


Vladimir 




Yes Sir. 


Boy 




What do you do? 


Vladimir 




( (proudly) 

I mind the goats, Sir. 


Boy 




Is he good to you? 


Vladimir 




Yes Sir. 


Boy 




He doesn't beat you? 


Vladimir 




No Sir, not me. 


Boy , ' 




Whom does he beat? 


Vladimir 





134 



Boy 
He beats my brother, Sir. 

Vladimir 
Ah, you have a brother? 

Boy 
les Sir. 

Vladimir 
What does he do? 

Boy 
He minds the sheep, Sir. 

Vladimir 
And why doesn't he beat you? 

Boy 
I don't know, Sir. 

Vladimir 
He must be fond of you. 

Boy 
I don't know, Sir. 

(Vladimir moves back to the right.) 

Vladimir 
Does he give you enough to eat? 



(The Boy hesitates.) 


Does he feed you well? 




Fairly well, Sir. 


Boy 




Vladimir 


You're not unhappy? 




(The Boy hesitates. 


Do you hear me? 




Yes Sir. 


Boy 


Well? 


Vladimir 


I don't know'y Sir. 


Boy 



135 



Vladimir 
You don't know if you're unhappy or not? 



No Sir. 


Boy 


(looking off) 
You're as bad as myself. 


Vladimir 


(He meditates.) 




Where do you sleep? 




In the loft, Sir. 


Boy 




Vladimir 


With your brother? 




Yes Sir. 


Boy 


In the hay? 


Vladimir 


Yes Sir. 


Boy 



(Vladimir moves back to the left side of the Boy. ) 
Vladimir 



AIL right , you may go . 

(He turns away.) 



Boy 



What am I to tell Mr. Godot, Sir? 

Vladimir 
Tell him... 

(He turns toward the Boy} 
Tell him you saw us. 

(He looks hard at the Boy.) 
You did see us, didn't you? 

Boy 



Yes Sir. 



(He looks carefully at Vladimir then turns and hurries 
away. It_suddenly becom es fright.) 



A 



136 



Vladimir 
(looking at the sky) 
At last J 



(Estragon gets up, takes a boot in each hand and places 
them completely downstage just a little right of center. 
He straightens up and looks at the sky.) 

What are you doing. Your boots, what are you doing with your 
boots? 

Estragon 
I'm leaving them there. Another will come, just as... as... as me, 
but with smaller feet, and they'll make him happy. 

Vladimir 
But you can't go barefoot '. 

Estragon 
Christ did. 

Vladimir 
Christ; What has Christ got to do with it? You're not going to 
compare yourself to ChirstJ 

Estragon 
All my life I've compared myself to him. 

Vladimir 
But where he lived it was warm, it was dry] 

Estragon 
Yes. And they crucified quick. 

(There is silence.) 

Vladimir 
We've nothing more to do here. 

Estragon . 
(resentfully) 
Nor anywhere else. 

Vladimir 
(comfortingly) 
Ah Gogo, don't go on like that. To-morrow everything will be 
better. 

Estragon 
How do you make that out? 

Vladimir 
Did you not hear what the boy said? 

Estragon 
No. 



137 



Vladimir 
He said that Godot was sure to come to-morrow. 

(Estragon says nothing.) 

What do you say to that? 

Estragon 
(decisively) 
Then all we have to do is to wait on here. 

Vladimir 
(fearfully) 
Are you mad? We must take cover. 

(He starts to pull Estragon toward the left exit.) 
Estragon yields then resists. They halt.) 

Estragon 
(looking at the tree) 
Pity we haven't got a bit of rope. 

Vladimir 
(resumes pulling) 
Come on. It's cold. 

(Estragon takes a few steps then stops.) 

Estragon 
Remind me to bring a bit of rope tomorrow. 

Vladimir 
(resumes pulling) 
Yes. Come on. 

(Estragon stops.) 

Estragon 
How long have we been together all the time now? 

Vladimir 
I don't know. Fifty years maybe. 

(Estragon walks slowly back down right.) 

Estragon 
Do you remember the day I threw myself into the Rhone? 

Vladimir 
We were grape harvesting. 

Estragon • 
(fondly) 
You fished me out. 



138 

Vladimir 
(impatiently) 
That's all dead and buried. 

Estragon 
My clothes dried in the sun. 

Vladimir 
There's no good harking back on that. Come on. 

(He drags Estragon toward the exit as before.) 

Estragon 
Wait J 

Vladimir 
(persisting) 
I'm cold J 

Estragon 
(harshly) 
Wait! 

(He pulls free and crosses to the mound where he sits.) 

I sometimes wonder if we wouldn't have been better off alone, 
each one for himself. We weren't made for the same road. 

Vladimir 
(without anger) 
It's not certain. 

Estragon 
No, nothing is certain. 

(Vladimir slowly crosses the stage and sits down 
beside Estragon.) 

Vladimir 
We can still part, if you think it would be better. 

Estragon 
It's not worth while new. 

(There is silence.) 

Vladimir 
No, it's not worth while now. 

(There is silence.) 

Estragon ^ 
Well, shall we go? 

Vladimir 
Yes, let's go 

(They do not move and the lights b1«nk nnt. . ) 



ACT II 



139 



Next day. 
Same time. 
Same place. 



HO 



Act II 



(The_houselights dim! and the stage lights come up 
on an empty stage. After about five counts Vladimir 
enters hurridly. He pantomimes the following ideas 
as he scurries about the stage: (l) Is Godot here 
yet? He sees that there is no one waiting. (2) He 
is relieved at first that he is not late. (3) Then 
he begins to wonder if perhaps he has missed him 
entirely. This worries him. (A) Perhaps he has come to 
the wrong place. He checks everything to see if it 
is familiar. He notices the leaves on the tree and 
is thrilled. (5) He decides that this is the place 
where he is supposed to rneej Godot. He begins to sing 
to pass the time,) 

Vladimir 
A dog came in — 

(He started to high and has to start over.) 

A dog came in the kitchen 
And stole a crust of bread. 
Then cook up with a ladle 
And beat him til he was dead. 

Then all the dogs came running 
And dug the dog a tomb — 

(He stops, broods and then resumes.) 

Then all the dogs came running 
And dug the dog a tomb 
And wrote upon the tombstone 
For the eyes of dogs to come: 

A dog came in the kitchen 
And stole a crust of bread. 
Then cook up with a ladle 
And beat him til he was dead. 

Then all the dogs came running 
And dug the dog a tomb — 

(He stops, broods, and then resumes.) 

Then all the dogs came running 
And dug the dog a tomb — 



z 



HI 



(He stops, broods and then says the following line.) 
Vladimir 



And dug the dog a tomb. 



(He suddenly remeraberB Estragon and becomes worried 
about him. He walks around looking for him. 

Gogo . Gogo . Gogo i 

(Just as he is about to get frantic Estragon enters 

from the right side. He is barefooted and very dejected". 

He moves to behind the mound.) 

You again J 

(Vladimir moves to embrace him. 

Come here till I embrace you. 

Estragon 
(turning away) 
Don't touch mei 

(Vladimir stops, hurt.) 

Vladimir 
Do you want me to go away. 

(He waits.) 
Gogoi 

(Vladimir observes him sympathetically.) 
Did they beat you? 

(Still no answer.) 
Gogoi 

(Estragon remains silent.) 

Where did you spend the night? 

Estragon 
(suddenly and violently) 
Don't touch me J Don't question mei Don't speak to mel 

(He turns back toward Vladimir and whimpers the last 
line without raising hie head.) 

Stay with mei 



uz 

Vladimir 



Did I ever leave you? 

Estragon 
You let me go. 

Vladimir 



Look at me. 



(Estragon doesn't look up. Vladimir bends far over and 
tips his head so he can see Estragon.) 

Will you look at me! 

(Estragon meets his eyes and as Vladimir raises up 
Estragon 's head comes up and they smile at each other. 
They suddenly embrace, clapping each other on the back. 
They break and Estragon crosses to down left.) 

Estragon 
(almost happily) 
What a day! 

Vladimir 
Who beat you? 

(He crosses after Estragon.) 

Tell me. 

Estragon 
Another day done with. 

Vladimir 
Not yet. 

Estragon 
For me it's over and done with, no matter what happens. 

(He remembers he was unhappy.) 

I heard you singing. 

Vladimir 
(pleased) 
That's right, I remember. 

Estragon 
That finished me. I said to myself, He's all alone, he thinks 
I'm gone for ever, and he sings. 

Vladimir 
One is not master of one's moods. All day I've felt in great form. 
I didn't get up in the night, not once J 







143 


You see, 


Estragon 
(sadly) ' 
you even go better when I'm not there. 


I missed 
strange 


you. . .and 
thing? 


Vladimir 
at the same time I was happy. Isn't that a 


Happy? 


(shocked 


Estragon 
and angered) 


Perhaps 


Vladimir 
it's not quite the right word. 


And now? 




Estragon 


Now? 




Vladimir 




(He runs joyfully to the mound and stands to it to 
address the world with outstretched arms.) 


There you are again J 




(He steps down onto the floor and says indifferently.) 


There we 


are again, 






(He sits 
his knees, 


gloomily down on the mound with his elbows on 
•) 


There I i 


am again. 




You see, 
too. 


Estragon 
you feel worse when I'm with you. Ii'feel better alone 


Then why 


Vladimir 
(vexed ) 
do you always come crawling back? 


I don't know. 


Estragon 


No, but I do. It's 
I wouldn't have let 


Vladimir 
I because you don't know how to defend yourself. 
i them beat you. 


Estragon 
You couldn't have stopped them. s 


Why not? 




Vladimir 



(proudly) 
There was ten of them. 



1U 

Estragon 



Vladimir 
No, I mean before they beat you. I would have stopped you from 
doing whatever it was you were doing. 

Estragon 
I wasn't doing anything. 

Vladimir 
Then why did they beat you7 

Estragon 
I don't know. 

(He turns away from Vladimir.) 

Vladimir 
Ah no, Gogo. 

(He goes to Estragon, puts his hands on his shoulders 
and turns him around to face him.) 

The truth is there are things escape you that don't escape me, 
you must feel it yourself. 

Estragon 
I tell you I wasn't doing anything. 

Vladimi r 
Perhaps you weren't. But it's the way of doing it that counts, 
the way of doing it, if you want to go on living. 

Estragon 
I wasn't doing anything. 

Vladimir 
You must be happy too, deep down, if you only knew it. 

Estragon 
Happy about what? 

Vladimir 
(joyfully) 
To be back with me again. 

Estragon 
Would you say so? 

Vladimir 
Say you are, even if it's not true. 

Estragon 
What am I to say? 



(arms flung out) 
Say, I am happy. 



U5 

Vladimir 



Estragon 
(arms flung partly out) 
I am happy. 



So am I. 

(mimicking) 
So am I. 

We are happy. 



Vladimir 
Estragon 

Vladimir 
Estragon 



We are happy. 

(There is a long silence. Estragon looks at Vladimir.) 

What do we do now, now that we are happy? 

Vladimir 
Wait for Godot. 

Estragon 
(groaning) 
Ahi 

Vladimir 
Things have changed here since yesterday. 

(He walks up left toward the tree.) 

Estragon 
And if he doesn't come? 

Vladimir 
(dismissing the idea) 
We'll see when the time comes. I was saying that things have 
changed here since yesterday. 

Estragon 
Everything oozes. 

Vladimir 
(looking at the tree) 
Look at the tree. 

Estragon 
It s never the same pus from one second to the next. 



U6 

Vladimir 
The tree, look at the tree. 

(Estragon turns and looks hard at the tree.) 

Estragon 
Was it not there yesterday? 

Vladimir 
Yes of course it was there. Do you not remember? We nearly 
hanged ourselves from it. But you wouldn't. Do you not remember? 

(Estragon crosses to the right of the tree. Vladimir 
is on the left of it.) 

Estragon 
You dreamt it. 

Vladimir 
It it possible you've forgotten already? 

Estragon 
That's the way I am. Either I forget immediately or I never 
forget. 

Vladimir 
And Pozzo and Lucky, have you forgotten them too? 

Estragon 
Pozzo and Lucky? 

Vladimir 
(to the audience) 
He's forgotten everything! 

(He walks toward right and turns in center stage.) 

Estragon 
I remember a lunatic who kicked the shins off me. Then he played 
the fool. 

Vladimir 
That was Lucky. 

Estragon 
I remember that, but when was it? 

Vladimir 
And his keeper, do you not remember him? 

Estragon 
He gave me a bone. , 

Vladimir 
That was Pozzo. 



U7 



Estragon 
And all that was yesterday, you say? 

Vladimir 
Yes of course it was yesterday. 

Estragon 
And here where we are now? 

Vladimir 
Where else do you think? Do you not recognize the place? 

Estragon 
(angrily) 
Recognize! What is there to recognize? 

(He crosses to the mound looking about him.) 

All my lousy life I've crawled about in the mud J And you talk 
to me about scenery! 

(He stands on the mound and indicates the area.) 

Look at this muckheap! I've never stirred from it J 

Vladimir 
Calm yourself, calm yourself. 

Estragon 
You and your landscapes! Tell me about the worms! 

Vladimir 
All the same, you can't tell me that this.... 

(He indicates the area.) 

Bears any resemblance to... to the Macon country for example. 
You can't deny there's a big difference. 

(Estragon steps off the mound up right.) 

Estragon 
The Macon country! Who's talking to you about the Macon country? 

Vladimir 
But you were there yourself, in the Macon country. 

Estragon 
No I was never in the Macon country! I've puked my puke of a life 
away here, I tell you! Here! In the Cackon country! 

Vladimir 
But we were there together, I could swear to it! Picking grapes 
for a man called..... * 

(He snaps his fingers and thinks.) 



US 



Vladimir (continued) 
Can't seem to think of the name of the man, at a place called.. 

(He snaps his fingers . ) 

Can't think of the name of the place, do you not remember? 

Estragon 
(a little calmer) 
It's possible. 

(He moves downstage several steps . ) 

I didn't notice anything. 

Vladimir 
But down there everything is red! 

Estragon 
(exasperated) 
I didn't notice anything I tell youi 

(In the silence Vladimir moves down left and sighs.) 

Vladimir 
You're a hard man to get on with, Gogo. 

(Estragon moves to down right.) 

Estragon 
It'd be better if we parted. 

Vladimir 
You always say that and you always come crawling back. 

Estragon 
The best thing would be to kill me, like the others. 

Vladimir 
What others? What other? 

Estragon 
Like billions of others. 

Vladimir 
(said out) 
To every man his little cross. Till he dies. And is forgotten. 

(Estragon crosses to stand beside Vladimir.) 

Estragon 
In the meantime let us try and converse calmly, since we are 
incapable of keeping silent. 

(They speak out toward the audience.) 















U9 


You': 


re right, we're 


Vladimir 
inexhaustible. 








It's 


so we won't think. 


Estragon 








We have that excuse 




Vladimir 








It's 


so we won't hear. 


Estragon 








We have our reasons. 




Vladimir 










(Estragon 


turns 


and starts up 


left 


.) 




All ■ 


bhe dead voices. 


. 


Estragon 










(Vladimir 


turns 


and follows him.) 






They 


Vladimir 
make a noise like wings. 










(Estragon 


moves 


around behind 


the 


tree 


looking at it.) 


Like 


leaves . 




Estragon 










(Vladimir 


follows him.) 








Like 


sand. 




Vladimir 








Like 


leaves . 




Estragon 










(There is 


a silence.) 








They 


all speak at once. 


Vladimir 










(Estragon 


moves 


on around the 


tree 


.) 




Each 


one to itself. 




Estragon 










(Vladimir 


follows him around the ti 


:ee. 


There is silence.) 


Rather they whisper. 
They rustle. 




Vladimir 
Estragon 











150 


Vladimir 
They murmer. 




Estragon 
They rustle. 




(They stand still, listening.) 




Vladimir 
What do they say? 




(Estragon starts to walk to below the mound.) 




Estragon 
They talk about their lives. 




Vladimir 
To have lived is not enough for them. 




Estragon 
They have to talk about it. 




(Vladimir follows Estragon who has stopped.) 




Vladimir 
To be dead is not enough for them. 




(He stops a little right of center stage. 




Estragon 
It is not sufficient. 




(There is silence.) 




Vladimir 
They make a noise like feathers. 




(Estragon crosses to the tree, looking at it.) 




Estragon 
Like leaves. 




Vladimir 
Like ashes. 




(Estragon stops in front of the tree and looks at it.) 




Estragon 
Like leaves. 




(There is a long silence. Estragon turns toward the 
audiance and they both think.) 




Vladimir 
Say something! 







151 




Estragon 
I'm trying. 




(There is a long silence.) 




Vladimir 
Say anything at all! 




Estragon 
What do we do now? 




Vladimir 
Wait for Godot. 




Estragon 
Ah! 




Vladimir 
This is awful! 




Estragon 
Sing something 




Vladimir 
No no! 




(He turns and starts a slow hesitant walk around the 
mound . ) 




We could start all over again perhaps. 




(Estragon turns and starts a slow hesitant circle 
around the tree corresponding with Vladimir's.) 




Estragon 
That should be easy. 




Vladimir 
It's the start that's difficult. 




Estragon 
You can start from anything. 




Vladimir 
Yes, but you have to decide. 




(He is now behind the mound and Estragon is behind the 
tree. They both stop and think.) 




Estragon 
True. 




(They think.) 




Vladimir 
(starting to move again) 
When you seek you hear. 



152 



Estragon 
(starting to move again) 
You do. 

Vladimir 
That prevents you from finding. 

Estragon 
It does. 

Vladimir 
That prevents you from thinking. 

Estragon 
(disagreeing) 
You think all the same. 

Vladimir 
(frightened) 
No no, impossible. 

(Vladimir is now down right and Estragon is down left. 
They stop.) 

Estragon 
That's the idea, let's contradict each other. 

Vladimir 
Impossible. 

Estragon 
You think so? 

Vladimir 
'We're in no danger of ever thinking any more. 

Estragon 
Then what are we complaining about? 

(Vladimir starts to move toward the center.) 

Vladimir 
Thinking is not the worst. 

(Estragon moves toward the center. Vladimir crosses 
behind Estragon.) 

Estragon 
Perhaps not. But at least there's that. 

Vladimir 
That what? 

Estragon 
That's the idea, let's ask each other questions. 



153 



Vladimir 
What do you mean, at least there's that? 

Estragon 
That muoh less misery. 

Vladimir 
True. 

Estragon 
Well? If we gave thanks for our mercies? 

(Vladimir starts to move hesitantly up right.) 

Vladimir 
What is terrible is to have thought. 

Estragon 
But did that ever happen to us? 

Vladimir 
Where are all these corpses from? 

Estragon 
These skeletons. 

Vladimir 
Tell me that. 

Estragon 
True. 

(Vladimir moves completely up left.) 

Vladimir 
We must have thought a little. 

(Estragon moves up right to the end of the mound.) 

Estragon 
At the very beginning. 

Vladimir 
(looking at the audience) 
A charnel-house J A charnel-house.' 

Estragon 
You don't have to look 

Vladimir 
You can't help looking. 

Estragon 
True. 





154 




Vladimir 


Try as one may. 




I beg your pardon? 


Estragon 


(Vladimir moves 


down stage a few paces . ) 




Vladimir 


Try as one may. 




(taking a step 
We should turn resolutely 


Estragon 
toward the tree.) 
towards Nature. 


(turning avay) 
We've tried that. 


Vladimir 


True. 


Estragon 




Vladimir 


Oh it's not the worst, I 


know. 


What? 


Estragon 


(Vladimir crosses to the downstage end of the mound.) 




Vladimir 


To have thought. 




Obviously. 


Estragon 




Vladimir 


But we could have done without it. 


Que voulez-vous? 


Estragon 




Vladimir 


I beg your pardon? 




Que voulez-vousi 


Estragon 




Vladimir 


Ah J que voulez-vous. Exactly. 


(Estragon moves 


to beside Vladimir.) 


Estragon 
That wasn't such a bad little canter. 



Yes, but now we'll have to 


Vladimir 
find something else. 






155 


Let me see. 


Estragon 








(He takes off his 


hat, concentrates.) 








Let me see. 


Vladimir 








(He takes off his 
silence.) 


hat and concentrates. 


There 


is a 


long 


Ah; 










(They put on their hats and relax. Estragon looks I 
^ladimir expectantly.) 


at 


Well? 


Estragon 








What was I saying, we could 


Vladimir 

go on from there. 








What were you saying when? 


Estragon 








At the very beginning. 


Vladimir 








The very beginning of WHAT? 


Estragon 








This evening... I was saying 


Vladimir 
. . .1 was saying... 








I'm not a historian. 


Estragon 








Wait... 


Vladimir 








(He sits on the end of the mound facing right, 


.) 




We embraced .. .we were happy.. .happy. . .what do we 
happy... go on waiting.. .waiting.. .let me think... 
go on waiting. . .now that we're happy... let me see 


do now that 
it's coming, 
i...ah! The 


we 're 
tree J 


The tree? 


Estragon 








Do you not remember? 


Vladimir 








I'm tired. 


Estragon 




1 











156 


(standing up) 
Look at it. 








(They both advance on the tree. Vladimir goes to 
left of it and Estragon stands looking at it from 
right.) 


the 
the 


Estragon 
I see nothing. 








Vladimir 
But yesterday evening it was all black and 
with leaves. 


. bare. Now it's 


covered 


Estragon 
Leaves ? 








Vladimir 
In a single night. 








Estragon 
It must be the Spring. 








Vladimir 
But in a single night! 








(Estragon walks upstage several 


steps.) 






Estragon 
I tell you we weren't here yesterday. Another of your 


nightmares. 


Vladimir 
And where were we yesterday evening according to you? 






Estragon 
(moving up right) 
How would I know? In another compartment. 


There's no 


lack 


of void. 


Vladimir 
Good. We weren't here yesterday evening, 
yesterday? 


Now what did we 


do 


Estragon 
(stopping and puzzling) 
Do? 








Vladimir 
Try and remember. 








Estragon 
Do... I suppose we blathered. 








Vladimir 
About what? 









157 



Estragon 
Oh... this and that I suppose, nothing in particular. 

(He moves behind the mound, turns and continues with 
assurance.) 

Yes, nov I remember, yesterday evening we spent blathering about 
nothing in particular. That's been going on now for half a 
century. 

Vladimir 
You don't remember any fact, any circumstances? 

Estragon 
(weary) 
Don't torment me, Didi. 

Vladimir 
The sun. The moon. Do you not remember? 

Estragon 
They must have been there, as usual. 

Vladimir 
You didn't notice anything out of the ordinary? 

Estragon 
Alas.' 

Vladimir 
And Pozzo? And Lucky? 

(Estragon moves around the mound to downstage right . ) 

Pozzo? 

Vladimir 
The bones. 

Estragon 
They were like fishbones. 

Vladimir 
It was Pozzo gave them to you. 

Estragon 
I don't know. 

Vladimir 
And the kick. 

(Estragon moves to in front of the mound.) 

Estragon 
That's right someone gave me a kick. 



158 



Vladimir 
It was Lucky gave it to you. 

Estragon 
And all that was yesterday? 

(Vladimir crosses to Estragon.) 

Vladimir 
Show your leg. 

Estragon 
Which? 

Vladimir 
Both. Pull up your trousers. Pull up your trousers. 

(Estragon makes no move to do so.) 

Estragon 
I can't. 

(Vladimir gets around beside him and picks up his 
left leg. He pulls up his trouser leg but there is 
no wound.) 

Vladimir 
The other. 

(Estragon gives him the same leg.) 
The other, pig! 

(He gets on the other side of Estragon and picks up 
his leg nearly tipping Estragon over. He sees the 
wound . ) 

There's the wound! Beginning to fester! 

(He abruptly drops the leg.) 

Estragon 
And what of it? 

Vladimir 
Where are your boots? 

Estragon 
I must have thrown them away. 

Vladimir 
When? 

Estragon 
I don't know. 



159 

Vladimir 
Why? 

Estragon 
(exasperated) 
I don't know why I don't know I 

Vladimir 
No, I mean why did you throw them away? 

Estragon 
(exasperated) 
Because they were hurting me J 

Vladimir 
(seeing the boots and pointing) 
There they arei At the very spot where you left them yesterday J 

(Estragon crosses to the boots and gets down on hands 
and knees to inspect them.) 

Estragon 
They're not mine. 

Vladimir 
(stupefied) 
Not yours! 

Estragon 
Mine were black. These are brown. 

Vladimir 
(moving to behind Estragon) 
You're sure yours were black? 

Estragon 
Well they were a kind of gray. 

Vladimir 
And these are brown. 

(He moves up beside Estragon.) 

Show. 

Estragon 
(picking up a boot) 
Well they're a kind of green. 

Vladimir 
Show. 

(Estragon hands him a boot. Vladimir inspects it, 
throws it down angrily.) 

Well of all the— 





160 


Estragon 
(standing up) 
You see, all that's a lot of bloody — 




(Vladimir moves two steps left.) 




Vladimir 
Ah J I see what it is. Yes, I see what's happened. 




Estragon 
All that's a lot of bloody — 




Vladimir 
(turning to explain) 
It's elementary. Someone came and took yours and left you his. 




Estragon 
Why? 




Vladimir 
His were too tight for him, so he took yours. 




Estragon 
But mine were too tight. 




Vladimir 
For you. Not for him. 




Estragon 




(it's too much for him) 
I'm tired! Let's go. 




Vladimir 
We can't. 




Estragon 
Why not? 




Vladimir 
We're waiting for Godot. 




Estragon 
Ah! What '11 we do, what '11 we do! 




Vladimir 
There's nothing we can do. 




(Estragon crosses to down right.) 




Estragon 
But I can't go on like this! 




Vladimir 
(crossing to him, gently) 
Would you like a radish? 





Is that all there is? 



161 

Estragon 



Vladimir 
There are radishes and turnips. 

Estragon 
Are there no carrots? 

Vladimir 
No. Anyway you overdo it with your carrots. 

Estragon 
Then give me a radish. 

(Vladimir fumbles in his pockets, finds nothing but 
turnips, finally brings out a radish and hands it 
to Estragon who examines it, sniffs it.) 

It's black i 

Vladimir 
It's a radish. 

Estragon 
I only like the pink ones, you know that! 

Vladimir 
Then you don't want it? 

Estragon 
I only like the pink ones! 

Vladimir 
(holding out his hand) 
Then give it back to me. 

(Estragon slaps the radish into his hand and Vladimir 
puts it back in his pocket.) 

Estragon 
(without moving) 
I ' 11 go and get a carrot . 

Vladimir 
This is becoming really insignificant. 

Estragon 
Not enough. 

(There is silence.) 

Vladimir 
How about trying them. 



162 



Estragon 
I've tried everything. 

Vladimir 
(indicating the boots) 
No, I mean the boots. 

Estragon 
Would that be a good thing? 

Vladimir 
It'd pass the time. 

(Estragon hesitates.) 

I assure you, it'd be an occupation. 

Estragon 



A relaxation. 
A recreation. 
A relaxation. 
Try. 

You'll help me? 



Vladimir 
Estragon 
Vladimir 
Estragon 
Vladimir 



I will of course. 

(Estragon gets the boots and comes back to center stage.) 

Estragon 
We don't manage too badly, eh Didi, between the two of us? 

Vladimir 
Yes yes. Come on, we'll try the left first. 

Estragon 
We always find something, eh Didi, to give us the impression we 
exist? 

Vladimir 
(impatiently) 
Yes yes, we're magicians, But let us persevere in what we have 
resolved, before we forget. Come on, give me your foot. 

(Estragon raises the wrong foot.) 













163 






Vladimir (continued) 








The other, 


hog! 












(Estragon raises 
on the boot . ) 


his other foot. Vladimir 


trii 


3S tO 


put 


Higher J 














(They stagger in 
finally the boot 


a counter-clockwise direction 
is on.) 


and 




Try and valk. 












(Estragon walks ■ 


boward the right.) 








Well? 












It fits. 


(surprised) 
(Vladimir takes 


Estragon 

string from his pocket.) 
Vladimir 








We'll try 


and lace it. 










No no, no 


(vehemently) 
laces, no laces ! 


Estragon 
Vladimir 








You'll be 


sorry. Let's try the other. 










(They stagger in a clockwise circle. This time Estragon 
accidentially puts his hand on Vladimir's hat and shoves 
it into his eyes.) 


Well? 














(He fixes his hat.) 








(grudgingly) 
It fits too. 


Estragon 










(He walks around a little testing them. ) 












Vladimir 








They don 1 


't hurt you? 










Not yet. 




Estragon 
Vladimir 








Then you 


can keep them. 











They're too big. 



164. 
Estragon 



Vladimir 
Perhaps you'll have socks some day. 

Estragon 
True. 

Vladimir 
Then you'll keep them? 

Estragon 
That's enough about these boots. 

Vladimir 
Yes, but — 

Estragon 
(violently) 
Enough ! 

(There is silence.) 

I suppose I might as well sit down. 

(He looks for a place in the audience but sees none. Then 
he turns and discovers the mound.) 

Vladimir 
That's where you were sitting yesterday evening. 

Estragon 
If I could only sleep. 

Vladimir 
Yesterday you slept. 

Estragon 
I'll try. 

(He resumes his foetal posture, his head between his 
knees.) 

Vladimir 
Wait. 

(He goes over and sits down beside Estragon and begins 
to sing in a loud voice.) 

Bye bye bye bye 
Bye bye — 

Estragon 
Not so loud J 



165 



Vladimir 
(softly to the tune of "Rock-a-bye Baby") 



Bye bye bye bye 
Bye bye bye bye 
Bye bye bye bye 
Bye bye .... 

(He checks and sees that Estragon is asleep. He gets 
up softly, takes off his coat and lays it across 
Estragon 's shoulders, then starts walking up and down, 
swinging his arms to keep himself warm. He walks 
from up center to down center. Estragon begins to 
moan and tremble. He gets wilder. Vladimir runs to 
him and comforts him.) 

There... there. ..Didi is there. . .don't be afraid... 

Estragon 
Ah! 

Vladimir 
There. . .there.. .it's all over. 

Estragon 
I was on top of a — 

Vladimir 
It's all over, it's all over. 

Estragon 
I was falling — 

Vladimir 
(violently) 
Don't tell me! Come, we'll walk it off. 

(He takes Estragon by the arm and walks him up and down 
in the same path he followed before. Estragon goes 
unwillingly and stops on the second round.) 

Estragon 
That ' s enough . I 'm tired . 

Vladimir 
You'd rather be stuck there doing nothing? 

Estragon 
Yes. 

Vladimir 
Please yourself. - 

(He picks up his coat, puts it on and continues walking 
up and down. Estragon stands in front of the mound 
watching him.) 







166 


Let 's go. 


Estragon 
Vladimir 




We can't. 






Why not? 


Estragon 
Vladimir 




We're waiting for Godot. 






Estragon 
Ahi Can you not stay still? 






Vladimir 




I'm cold. 






We came too soon. 


Estragon 
Vladimir 




It's always at nightfall. 






But night doesn't fall. 


Estragon 
Vladimir 




It'll fall all of a sudden 


, like yesterday. 




Then it'll be night. 


Estragon 




(hopefully) 
And we can go. 


Vladimir 
Estragon 




(despairing) 
Then it'll be day again. 






(He wails.) 






What '11 we do, what '11 we doi 




Vladimir 
(halting violently) 
Will you stop whining.' 




(Ke walks toward 


him a few paces.) 




I 've had about my bellyful 


of your lamentations! 




Estragon 
(going to right exit) 




I'm going. 


/ 





167 



Vladimir 
(noticing Lucky 's hat) 

Well J 

i 

Estragon 
Farewell . 

Vladimir 
Lucky 's hat. 

(He goes toward it.) 
I've been here an hour and never saw it. 

(He is pleased.) 
Fine! 



You'll never see me again. 



Estragon 



Vladimir 
I knew it was the right place. Now our troubles are over. 

(He picks up the hat, contemplates it, straightens it.) 

Must have been a very fine hat. 

(He motions to Estragon who moves toward him.) 



Here. 



(He hands his own hat to Estragon and places Lucky' s on 
his head. Estragon takes Vladimir's hat. Vladimir 
adjusts Lucky 's hat on his head. Estragcn puts on 
Vladimir's hat in place of his own which he hands to 
Vladimir. Vladimir takes Estragon's hat. Estragon 
adjusts Vladimir's hat on his head. Vladimir puts on 
Estragon 's hat in place of Lucky's which he hands to 
Estragon. Estragon takes Lucky's hat. Vladimir adjusts 
Estragon's hat on his head. Estragon puts on Lucky's 
hat in place of Vladimir's which he hands to Vladimir. 
Vladimir takes his hat. Estragon adjusts Lucky's hat 
on his head. The proscess speeds up. Vladimir puts on 
his hat in place of Estragon's which he hands to Estragon. 
Estragon takes his hat. Vladimir adjusts his hat on his 
head. Estragon puts on his hat in place of Lucky's 
Which he hands to Vladimir. Vladimir takes Lucky's hat. 
Estragon adjusts his hat on his head. Vladimir puts on 
Lucky's hat in place of his own which he hands to Estragon. 
Estragon takes Vladimir's hat. Vladimir adjusts Lucky's 
hat on his head. Estragon hands Vladimir's hat back to 
Vladimir who takes it and hands it back to Estragon who 
takes it and hands it back to Vladimir who takes it and 
throws it to one side.) 



168 

Vladimir (continued) 
How does it fit me? 

Estragon 
How would I know? 

Vladimir 
No, but how do I look in it? 

(He turns his head ooquettishly to and fro, minces 
like a mannequin. 

Estragon 
Hideous. 

Vladimir 
Yes, but not more so than usual? 

Estragon 
Neither more nor less. 

Vladimir 
Then I can keep it. Mine irked me. How shall I say? It itched me. 

(He takes off Lucky 's hat, peers into it, shakes it, 
knocks on the crown, puts it on again.) 

Estragon 
I'm going. 

(There is silence.) 

Vladimir 
Will you not play? 

Estragon 
Play at what? 

Vladimir 
We could play at Pozzo and Lucky. 

Estragon 
Never heard of it. 

Vladimir 
I'll do Lucky, you do Pozzo. 

(He imitates Lucky sagging under the weight of his baggage. 
Estragon looks at him with stupefacation.) 

Go on. 

Estragon 
What am I to do? 



169 



Vladimir 
Curse me J 

Estragon 
(after reflection) 
Naughty.' 

Vladimir 
Stronger! 

Estragon 
(turning away to think then turning back) 
Gonococcus! Spirochete! 

(Vladimir sways back and forth, doubled in two.) 

Vladimir 
Tell me to think. 

Estragon 
What? 

Vladimir 
Say, Think, pig! 

Estragon 
Think, pig J 

(Vladimir strains to speak.) 

Vladimir 
(standing up) 
I can't. 

Estragon 
That's enough of that. 

Vladimir 
Tell me to dance. 

Estragon 
I'm going. 

(He starts to leave up right.) 

Vladimir 
Dance, hog! 

(He can't dance but while he is trying to Estragon 
exits . ) 

I can't! , 

(He looks up, misses Estragon.) 



170 




Vladimir (continued) 
Gogol 




(He runs about the stage wildly looking behind the tree 
and behind the mound for Estragon. Just as he is looking 
behind the mound Estragon races through the door right 
into his arms.) 




There you are again at last! 




Estragon 
I'm accursedl 




Vladimir 
Where were you? I thought you were gone forever. 




Estragon 
(excited and afraid) 
They're coming J 




Vladimir 
Who? 




Estragon 
I don't know. 


- 


Vladimir 
How many? 




Estragon 
I don't know. 




Vladimir 
(triumphantly) 
It's Godot! At last! Gogol It's Godot! We're saved! Let's 
go and meet him! 




(He drags Estragon toward the door. At first Estragon 
seems delighted but he suddenly becomes afraid and pulls 
free. He runs out the left exit.) 




Gogol Come back! 




(He goes out the right exit and returns immediately to 
dash toward the left exit just as Estragon runs back in. 
The two meet in the center and embrace. 




There you are again again! 




Estragon 
(terrified) 
I'm in hell! 




Vladimir 
Where were you? 





171 

Estragon 
They're coming there tool 

Vladimir 
We're surrounded J 

(Estragon turns and tries to claw his way out the back 
wall.) 

Imbecile! There's no way out there. 

(He takes Estragon by the arm and drags him towards the 
front. He tries to push him off into the audience.) 

There i Not a soul in sight; Off you go! Quick J 

(Estragon recoils in horror and freeing himself stumbles 
back to center stage.) 

You won't? 

(Vladimir contemplates the audience.) 
Well I cap understand that. Wait til I see. 

(He thinks.) 
Your only hope left is to disappear. 

(Estragon stands in one place and struggles to "disappear.") 

Estragon 
I can'ti 

Vladimir 
Your only hope left is behind the tree. 

Estragon 
Where? 

Vladimir 
Behind the tree. 

(Estragon hesitates.) 

Quick; Behind the tree. 

(Estragon hurries behind the tree and Vladimir joins 
him there. They crouch there for a second or two then 
Vladimir realizes they are not hidden. He comes out 
and looks sadly at the tree.) 

Decidedly this tree will not have been the slightest use to us. 



172 

Estragon 
(coming out from behind the tree.) 
I lost my head. Forgive me. It won't happen again. Tell me 
what to do. 

Vladimir 
There's nothing to do. 

Estragon 
You go and stand there. 

(He takes Vladimir to the extreme right downstage and 
places him facing out right.) 

There, don't move, and watch out. 

(Vladimir scans the horizon, screening his eyes with 
his hand. Estragon crosses the stage and takes the 
same position at the left.) 

Back to back like in the good old days. 

(They keep watch.) 

Do you see anything coming? 

Vladimir 



What? 


(turning his head) 


Do you 


Estragon 
(louder) 
see anything coming? 


No. 


Vladimir 


Nor I. 


Estragon 




(They resume watch.) 




Vladimir 



You must have had a vision. 

Estragon 
What? 

Vladimir 
(shouting) 
You must have had a vision. 

Estragon 
(shouting) 
No need to shout I 



173 



(There is a 7 count silence then they both speak at 
once.) 

Vladimir and Estragon 
Do you — 



(politely) 
Oh pardon! 



(too politely) 
Carry on. 



No no, after you. 
No no, you first. 
I interrupted you. 



Vladimir 

Estragon 

Vladimir 
Estragon 
Vladimir 
Estragon 



(snarling) 
On the contrary. 

(They glare at one another and move toward the center 
of the stage.) 

Vladimir 
Ceren;. I ous ape! 

Estragon 
Punctilious pig? 

Vladimir 
Finish your phrase, I tell you 

Estragon 
Finish your own] 

(There is silence. They are face to face.) 

Vladimir 
Moron ! 

Estragon 
(happily) 
That's the idea, let's abuse each other. 

(They do a sharp about face and march sharply to their 
respective edges of the stage. They turn in dueling 
fashion and face one another. 





w 


(taking a step) 
Moroni 


Vladimir 


(taking a step) 
Vermin ! 


Estragon 


(taking a step) 
Abortion i 


Vladimir 


(taking a step) 
Morpionl 


Estragon 


(taking a step) 
Eewer-ratl 


Vladimir 


(taking a step) 
Curate! 


Estragon 


(taking a step) 
Cretin J 


Vladimir 


(They are face to face.) 


(taking the last 
CrriticJ 


Estragon 
step and stating with finality) 


(vanquished) 
OhJ 


Vladimir 


(He turns away doubled up. Estragon struts back left.) 


(turning) 
Now let ' s make it up . 


Estragon 


Gogol 


Vladimir 


Didi! 


Estragon 


(holding out his 
Your hand J 


Vladimir 
hand) 


Estragon 
(moving toward him) 
Take it J 



175 



Vladimir 
(holding out his arms) 
Come to my arms I 

Estragon 
(hesitating) 
Your arms? 

Vladimir 
My breast! 

Estragon 
Off we go! 

(They embrace, pounding one another on the back. 
They separate.) 

Vladimir 
How time flies when one has fun! 

(There is silence.) 

Estragon 
What do we do now? 

Vladimir 
While waiting. 

Estragon 
While waiting. 

(There is silence.) 

Vladimir 
We could do our exercises. 

Estragon 



Our movements. 
Our elevations. 
Our relaxations 
Our elongations. 
Our relaxations. 
To warm us up. 
To calm us down. 



Vladimir 
Estragon 
Vladimir 
Estragon 
Vladimir 
Estragon 






176 
Vladimir 



Off we go. 



(Vladimir does the "Jumping Jack." Estragon watches 
him then tries to imitate him but does poorly. He only- 
jumps twice then stops and watches Vladimir some more.) 

Estragon 
That's enough. I'm tired. 

Vladimir 
(stopping) 
We're not in form. What about a little deep breathing? 

Estragon 
I'm tired breathing. 

Vladimir 
You're right. Let's just do the tree, for the balance. 

Estragon 
The tree? 

(Vladimir holds his arms out in imitation of the tree's 
branches and standing on one foot he hops in a circle.) 

Vladimir 
(stopping) 
Your turn. 

(Estragon tries to imitate Vladimir. He hops in a 
circle but cheats by putting the other foot down now 
and then . ) 

Estragon 
Do you think God sees me? 

Vladimir 
You must close your eyes. 

(Estragon closes his eyes and staggers worse. He is 
now near the upstage end of the mound . ) 

Estragon 
God have pity on me! 

Vladimir 
(vexed) 
And me? 

Estragon 
(falling to his knees by the mound) 
On me! On me! Pity! On me! ■ 



177 



(Enter Pozzo and Lucky from the right exit. Pozzo is 
blind. Lucky is burdened as before. The rope is much 
shorter so that Pozzo may follow more easily. Lucky 
is wearing a different hat. At the sight of Vladimir 
and Estragon he stops short. Pozzo, continuing on his 
way, bumps into him and they both go down.) 

Vladimir 



Gogol 



Estragon opens his eyes and gets up.) 

Pozzo 
(struggling) 
What is it? Who is it? 

Estragon 
Is it Godot? 

Vladimir 
At last! 

(He is delighted. He moves to in front of the mound.) 

Reinforcements at last! 

Pozzo 
(crawling over Lucky) 
Help! 

Estragon 
Is it Godot? 

Vladimir 
We were beginning to weaken. Now we're sure to see the evening 
out. 

Pozzo 
Help! 

Estragon 
Do you hear him? 

Vladimir 
We are no longer alone, waiting for the night, waiting for Godot, 
waiting for. . .waiting, fill evening we have struggled, unassisted. 
Now it's over. It's already to-morrow. 

- 

Pozzo 
Help! 

Vladimir 
Time flows again already. The sun will set, the moon rise, and we 
away... from here. 



178 



Pityi 


Pozzo 


Poor Pozzo.' 


Vladimir 


I knew it was him. 


Estragon 


(He is happy.) 





Who? . 
Godot. 
But it's not Godot. 



(disillusioned) 
It's not Godot? 



It's not Godot. 



(angrily) 
Then who is it? 



Vladimir 
Estragon 
Vladimir 
Estragon 

Vladimir 
Estragon 

Vladimir 



It's Pozzo. 

(Pozzo is crawling along the edge of right stage.) 
Pozzo 



(to the audience 
Here! Here! Help me upi 


<) 


He can ' t get up . 


Vladimir 


Let's go. 


Estragon 


We can't. 


Vladimir 


Why not? 


Estragon 


We're waiting for Godot. 


Vladimir 


























179 


Estragon 
AhJ 

Vladimir 
Perhaps he has another bone for you. 








Bone? 


Estragon 








Vladimir 
Chicken. Do you not remember? 








It was him? 


Estragon 








Yes. 


Vladimir 








Ask him. 


Estragon 








(Pozzo has moved 


to upstage 


right.) 






Perhaps we should help him 


Vladimir 
first. 








To do what? 


Estragon 








To get up. 


Vladimir 








He can't get up? 


Estragon 








He wants to get up. 


Vladimir 








Then let him get up. 


Estragon 


/ 






He can't. 


Vladimir 








Why not? 


Estragon 








I don't know. 


Vladimir 








Estragon 
We should ask him for the bone first. 
leave him there. 


Then if he refuses 


we'll 




You mean we have him at our 


Vladimir 
mercy? 









180 

Estragon 
Yes. 

(Pozzo crawls toward the mound.) 

Vladimir 
And that we should subordinate our good offices to certain conditions? 

Estragon 
What? 

Vladimir 
That seems intelligent all right. But there's one thing I'm afraid 
of. 

Pozzo 

Help! 

Estragon 
What? 

Vladimir 
(indicating Lucky) 
That Lucky might get going all of a sudden. Then we'd be ballocksed. 

Estragon 
Lucky? 

Vladimir 
The one that went for you yesterday. 

Estragon 
I tell you there was ten of them. 

Vladimir 
Mo, before that, the one that kicked you. 



Estragon 
Is he there? 

Vladimir 
As large as life. 

(He moves back and Estragon moves up so he can see 
Lucky. ) 

For the moment he is inert. But he might run amuck any minute. 

Estragon 
And suppose we gave him a good beating the two of us? 

Pozzo 
Help! 

Vladimir 
You mer.n if we fell on him in his sleep? 



(eagerly) 
Yes. 



181 
Estragon 






Vladimir 
That seems a good idea all right. But could we do it? Is he 
really asleep? 

(He moves over to look closely at Lucky. ) 

No, the best would be to take advantage of Pozzo's calling for 

help — 

Pozzo 
Help J 

(Pozzo is feeling around close to Estragon and Estragon 
gets on the mound to escape him.) 

Vladimir 
To help him — 

Estragon 
We help him? 

Vladimir 
In anticipation of some tangible return. 

Estragon 
And suppose he — 

Vladimir 
Let us not waste our time in idle discourse! Let us do something, 
while we have the chance i It is not everyday that we are needed. 
Not indeed that we personally are needed. Others would meet the 
case equally well, if not better. To all mankind they were 
addressed, those cries for help still ringing in our ears! 

(He moves completely down right. He shoves the baggage 
that Lucky dropped back onto Lucky.) 

But at this place, at this moment of time, all mankind is us, 
whether we like it or not. Let us make the most of it, before it 
is too late! Let us represent worthily for once the foul brood 
to which a cruel fate consigned us! What do you say? 

(He addresses this to Estragon but doesn't wait for an 
answer. He crosses to down center left.) 

It is true that when with folded arms we weigh the pros and cons 
we are no less a credit to our species. The tiger bounds to the 
help of his congeners without the least reflexion, or else he 
slinks away into the depths of the thickets. 

(He moves to talk directly to Estragon.) 



182 

Vladimir (continued) 
But that is not the question. What are we doing here, that is the 
question. And we are blessed in this, that we happen to know the 
answer. 

(Kstragon is happily nodding agreement. He thinks he 
is going to learn the "answer.") 

Yes, in this immense confusion one thing is clear. 

(Pozzo feels for the person who is speaking but just as 
he nearly reaches Vladimir, Vladimir moves to the other 
side of Estragon.) 

We are waiting for Godot to come — 

(Estragon is disappointed.) 

Estragon 
Ah! 

Pozzo 
Helpi 

Vladimir 
(crossing to center right) 
Or for night to fall. We have kept our appointment and that's 
an end to that. We are not saints, but we have kept our appointment. 

(He crosses back to Estragon.) 

How many people can boast as much? 

Estragon 
(getting off the mound) 
Billions. 



You think so? 
I don t know. 
You may be right. 



Vladimir 
Estragon 
Vladimir 



Pozzo 
(moving after Vladimir) 
Help J 

(Vladimir moves to center right.) 

Vladimir 
All I know is that the hours are long, under these conditions, and 
constrain us to beguile them with proceedings which — how shall I say — 



183 



Vladimir 
Which may at first sight seem reasonable, until they become a habit. 
You may say it is to prevent our reason from foundering. No doubt. 
But has it not long been straying in the night without end of the 
abyssal depths? 

(He moves to down right.) 

That's what I sometimes wonder. You follow my reasoning? 

Estragon 
We are all born mad. Some remain so. 

(Pozzo is a little right of center stage.) 

Pozzo 



Helpi I'll pay you I 

(going to him) 

How much? 

One hundred francs! 



Estragon 



Pozzo 
Estragon 



It's not enough. 

(He goes back to stand beside the mound.) 

Vladimir 
(moving to center stage) 
I wouldn't go so far as that. 

Estragon 
You think it's enough? 

Vladimir 
No, I mean so far as to assert that I was weak in the head when I 
came into the world. But that is not the question. 

Pozzo 
Two hundred! 

(Vladimir crosses to far right.) 

Vladimir 
We wait. We are bored. 

(Estragon says nothing. Vladimir hurries to him waving 
his arms as if he had protested.) 

No, don't protest, we are bored to death, there's no denying it. 
Good. A diversion comes along and what do we do? We let it go 
to waste. Come, let's get to work! 



134 

(He starts toward Pozzo then stops.) 

Vladimir 
In an instant all will vanish and we'll be alone once more, in 
the midst of nothingness i 

(He thinks.) 

Pozzo 
Two hundred! 

Vladimir 
We're coming! i 

(He tries to pull Pozzo to his feet but is instead 
pulled to the floor where he lies beside Pozzo in 
center stage.) 

Estragon 
What's the matter with you all? 



Vladimir 
Help! 




Estragon 
I 'm going. 




Vladimir 
Don't leave me! They'll kill me! 




Pozzo 
Where am I? 




Vladimir 
Gogo! 




Pozzo 
(grabbing at Vladimir) 
Help! 




Vladimir 
(fending Pozzo off) 
Help! 





Estragon 
I'm going. 

Vladimir 
Help me up first, then we'll go together. 

Estragon 
You promise? 

Vladimir 
I swear it! 



And we'll never come back? 



Never! 



We'll go to the Pyrenees. 



Wherever you like. 



Estragon 



Vladimir 



Estragon 



Vladimir 



185 



Estragon 
I 've always wanted to wander in the Pyrenees . 

Vladimir 
You'll wander in them. Quick! Give me your hand! 

(He holds out his hand.) 

Estragon 
(making as if to leave) 



I'm going. 



(He waits for a reaction.) 

I 'm going. 

Vladimir 
Well I suppose in the end I'll get up by myself. 

(He tries and fails.) 

In the fullness of time. 

(He just relaxes.) 

Estragon 



What's the matter with you? 
Go to hell. 

Are you staying there? 
For the time being. 



Vladimir 
Estragon 

Vladimir 



Estragon 
Come on, get up, you'll catch a chill. 

Vladimir 
Don't worry about me. 

(He is on his back.) 





186 


Estragon 
Come on, Didi, don't be pig-headed.' 




(He reaches across Pozzo to help Vladimir up. Pozzo hears 
him and grabs for him bringing him down on his right side. 
They are all three lying in center stage with Estr..gon 
on the right, Pozzo in the center and Vladimir on the left.) 


Pozzo 
HelpJ 




Vladimir 
(turning over) 
We've arrived. 




Pozzo 
Who are you? 




Vladimir 
We are men. 




(There is silence.) 




Estragon 
(patting the ground under his head) 
Sweet mother earth! 


Vladimir 
Can you get up? 




Estragon 
I don't know. 




Vladimir 
Try. 




Estragon 
Not now, not now. 




Pozzo 
(grabbing at Vladimir) 
What happened? 


- 


Vladimir 
(violently) 

Will you stop it, you J 




(He fends him off.) 




PestJ He can think of nothing but himself! 


Estragon 
(sleepily) 
How about a little snooze? 









188 



Estragon 
Yes, call to him. 

Vladimir 
(softly) 
Pozzo! 

(There is silence. ) 

Pozzo! 

(More silence.) 

No reply. 

Estragon 
Together. 

Vladimir and Estragon 
Pozzoi Pozzo! 

IPozzo moves.; 

Vladimir 
He moved. 

Estragon 
Are you sure his name is Pozzo? 

Vladimir 
(alarmed) 
Mr. Pozzoi Come back! We won't hurt you! 

(There is no reply.) 

Estragon 
We might try him with other names. 

Vladimir 
I'm afraid he's dying. 

Estragon 
It'd be amusing. 

Vladimir 
(horrified) 
What 'd be amusing? 

Estragon 
To try him with other names, one after the other. It'd pass the 
time and we'd be bound to hit on the right one sooner or later. 

Vladimir 
I tell you his name is Pozzo. 



189 



We'll soon see. 

(He reflects.) 
Abel J Abel! 

Help! 



(proudly) 
Got It in one! 



Estragon 



Pozzo 



Estragon 



Vladimir 
(resting his head on his hand) 
I begin to weary of this motif. 

Estragon 
Perhaps the other is called Cain. 

(He turns toward Lucky.) 

Cain! Cain! 

_ 
Pozzo 

Help! 

(Estragon turns onto his back and looks at Pozzo.) 

Estragon 
He's all humanity. 

(He looks straight up.) 

Look at the little cloud. 

Vladimir 
(raising his eyes) 

Where? 

Estragon 
(pointing) 
There. In the zenith. 

Vladimir 
(turning over) 
Well? What is there so wonderful about it? 

(There is silence.) 

Estragon 
Let's pass on now to something else, do you r.' " 



Vladimir 
I was just going to suggest it. 


190 


Estragon 
But to vhat? 




Vladimir 
Ah.' 




(They think.) 




Estragon 
(sitting up) 
Suppose we got up to begin with? 




Vladimir 
No harm trying. 




(He sits up. Then they both get up.) 




Estragon 
Child's play. 




Vladimir 
(dusting himself off) 
Simple question of will-power. 




Estragon 
And now? 




(Pozzo crawls on around the tree to downstage left.) 




Pozzo 
Helpi 




Estragon 
Let's go. 




Vladimir 
We can't 




Estragon 
Why not? 




Vladimir 
We're waiting for Godot. 




Estragon 
Ah J 

• 




(He moans despairingly.) 
What '11 we do, what '11 we do! 




Pozzo 
Help! 











191 


Vladimir 
What about helping him? 




Estragon 
What does he want? 




Vladimir 
He wants to get up. 




Estragon 
Then why doesn't he? 




Vladimir 
He wants us to help him to get up. 




Estragon 
(impatiently) 
They why don't we? What are we waiting 


for? 


(He leads the way to Pozzo. 
Pozzo's left side. Vladimir 
help Pozzo to his feet. His 


He steps over him to get on 

is on the right. They 

legs refuse to support him.) 


Vladimir 
We must hold him. 




(Pozzo sags between them, his 


arms round their necks.) 


Feeling better? 




Pozzo 
Who are you? 




Vladimir 




Do you not recognize us? 




Pozzo 
I am blind. 




Estragon 
(cheerfully) 
Perhaps he can see into the future. 




Vladimir 
Since when? 




Pozzo 
I used to have wonderful sight — but are 


you friends? 


Estragon 
(chuckling) 
He wants to know if we are friends J 




Vladimir 
No, he means friends of his. 









192 



Estragon 
Well? 

Vladimir 
We've proved we are, by helping him. 

Estragon 
Exactly. Would we have helped him if we weren't his friends? 

Vladimir 
Possibly. 

Estragon 

True. 

Vladimir 
Don't let's quibble about that now. 



Pozzo 
You are not highwaymen? 

Estragon 
Highwaymen i Do we look like highwaymen? 

Vladimir 
stage whisper) 
Damn it can'o you see the man is blind! 

Estragon 
(locking ) 
Damn it so he is. So he says. 

Pozzo 
(tightening his grip around their necks) 
Don't leave mei 

Vladimir 
No question of it. 

Estragon 
For the moment. 

Pozzo 
What time is it? 

Vladimir 
(inspecting the sky) 
Seven o'clock... eight o'clock... 

Estragon 
That depends on what time of year it is. 

Pozzo 
Is it evening? 

(Vladimir and Estragon scrutinize the sunset.) 



193 



Estragon 
It's rising 

Vladimir 

Impossible. 

Estragon 
Perhaps it ' s the dawn . 

Vladimir 
Don't be a fool. It's the west over there. 

(Ke does not indicate a direction.) 

Estragon 



How do you know? 

(anguished) 
Is it evening? 

Anyway it hasn't moved. 

I tell you it's rising. 

Why don't you answer me? 



Pozzo 

Vladimir 
Estragon 
Pozzo 



Estragon 
Why don't you give us a chance? 

Vladimir 
(moving three steps toward center dragging all along) 
It's evening, Sir, it's evening, night is drawing nigh. My friend 
here would have me doubt it and I must confess he shook me for a 
moment. But it is not for nothing I have lived through this long 
day and I can assure you it is very near the end of its repertory. 
How do you feel now? 

Estragon 
(peeved) 
How much longer are we to cart him around. We are not caryatids J 

Vladimir 
You were saying your sight used to be good, if I heard you right. 

Pozzo 
Wonderful! Wonderful, wonderful sight! 

(There is silence.) / 

Estragon 
(irritably) 
Expand J Expand 1 



194 



Vladimir 
Let him alone. Can't you see he's thinking of the days when he 
was happy. Memoria praeteritorum bonorum — that must be unpleasant. 

Estragon 
We uouldn ' t know . 

Vladimir 
And it came on you all of a sudden? 

Pozzo 
(in a daze) 
Quite wonderful; 

Vladimir 
I'm asking you if it came on you all of a sudden. 

Pozzo 
I woke up one fine day as blind as Fortune. 

(He pauses.) 

Sometimes I wonder if I'm not still asleep. 

Vladimir 
And when was that? 

Pozzo 
I don't know. 

Vladimir 
But no later than yesterday — 

/ 
Pozzo 
(violently) 
Don't question me.' The blind have no notion of time. The things 
of time are hidden from them too. 

Vladimir 
Well just fancy that; I could have sworn it was just the opposite. 

Estragon 
I 'm going. 

(He does not move.) 

Pozzo 
Where are we? 

Vladimir 
I couldn't tell you. 

Pozzo 
H isn't by any chance the place known as the Board? 





195 


Vladimir 




Never heard of it. 




Pozzo 




What is it like? 




Vladimir 
(looking around) 




It's indescribable. It's like.. .nothing. There's nothing. 




(He glances over his shoulder.) 




There's a tree. 




Pozzo 




Then it's not the Board. 




Estragon 




(sagging) 
Some diversion! 




Pozzo 




Where is my menial? 




Vladimir 




He ' s about somewhere . 




Pozzo 




Why doesn't he answer when I call? 




Vladimir 




I don't know. He seems to be sleeping. Perhaps he's dead. 




Pozzo 




What happened exactly? 




Estragon 
Exactly! 




Vladimir 




The two of you slipped. And fell. 




Pozzo 




Go and see is he hurt. 




Vladimir 




We can't leave you. 




Pozzo 




You needn ' t both go . 




Vladimir 
(to Estragon) 




You go. 




' 















196 


Estragon 
After what he did to me? Never! 


Pozzo 
(in a stage whisper) 
Yes yes, let your friend go. 


(He shoves Estragon away. ) 


He stinks so. 

(Nobody moves . ) 




What is he waiting for? 




What you waiting for? 


Vladimir 


(with assurance) 
I'm waiting for Godot. 


Estragon 


(No one moves.) 




What exactly should he do? 


Vladimir 


Pozzo 
Well to begin with he should pull on the rope, as hard as he likes 
so long as he doesn't strangle him. He usually responds to that. 
If not he should give him a taste of his boot, in the face and the 
privates as far as possible. 


(to Estragon) 
You see, you've nothing to 
to revenge yourself. 


Vladimir 
be afraid of. It's even an opportunity 


(Estragon crosses 


in front of them and stops.) 


And if he defends himself? 


Estragon 


Pozzo 
No no, he never defends himself. 


Vladimir 
I'll come flying to the rescue. 


Don't take your eyes off me 


Estragon 


(He goes towards 


Lucky.) 


Make sure he's alive before 
yourself if he's dead. 


Vladimir 

you start. No point in exerting 



197 



Estragon 
(bending over Lucky and lifting an eyelid) 
He ' s breathing . 

Vladimir 
Then let him have it. 

(With sudden fury Estragon starts kicking Lucky but he 
hurts his foot and moves upstage, limping and groaning.) 

Estragon 
Oh the brute. 1 

(He limps back to the mound and tries to take off his 
boot. But he soon desists and disposes himself for 
sleep, his arms on his knees and his head on his arms.) 

Pozzo 
What's gone wrong now? 

Vladimir 
My friend has hurt himself. 



And Lucky: 

So it is he? 

What? 

It is Lucky? 

I don't understand. 

And you are Pozzo? 



Pozzo 



Vladimir 



Pozzo 



Vladimir 



Pozzo 



Vladimir 



(He grabs Pozzo by the coat collar and jerks him upright 
so that he may look at him.) 

Pozzo 
(with pride) 
Certainly I am Pozzo. 

Vladimir 
The same as yesterday? 

Pozzo 
Yesterday? 

Vladimir 
Vie met yesterday. Do you not remember? 



198 



Pozzo 
I don't remember having met anyone yesterday. But to-morrow I 
von't remember having met anyone to-day. So don't count on me to 
enlighten you. 

Vladimir 
But— 

Pozzo 
Enoughi Up pig! 

(This is the old Pozzo.) 

Vladimir 
You were bringing him to the fair to sell him. You spoke to us. 
He danced. He thought. You had your sight. 

Pozzo 
As you please. 

(He shoves Vladimir away. Vladimir moves right center 
slightly.) 

Let me go I Upi 

(Lucky gets up and gathers up his burdens.) 

Vladimir 
Where do you go from here. 

Pozzo 

On. 

(Lucky moves to Pozzo.) 
Whip J 

(Lucky gives him his whip. He carries it upside down.) 

Rope; 

(Lucky hands him the rope and they prepare to move on.) 

Vladimir 
What is there in the bag? 

Pozzo 
Sand. 

(He shakes the rope.) 

On; 

Vladimir 
Don't go yet. 



199 
Pozzo 



I'm going. 



Vladimir 
What do you do when you fall far from help? 

Pozzo 
We wait til we can get up. Then we go on. Onl 

(They move a few steps.) 

Vladimir 
(stopping them) 
Before you go tell him to sing. 

Pozzo 
Who? 

Vladimir 
Lucky . 

Pozzo 
To sing? 

Vladimir 
Yes. Or to think. Or to recite. 



But he is dumb. 

Dumbi 

Dumb. He can't even groan. 

Dumbi Since when? 



Pozzo 



Vladimir 



Pozzo 



Vladimir 



Pozzo 
(furiously to the whole world) 
Have you not done tormenting me with your accursed time I It's 
abominable; Wheni Wheni One day, is that not enough for you, 
one day he went dumb, one day I went blind, one day we'll go deaf, 
one day we were born, one day we shall die, the same day, the same 
second, is that not enough for you? They give birth astride of 
a grave, the light gleams an instant, then it's night once more. 



On J 



(He shakes the rope.) 



(They exit. Vladimir follows them to the door. There is /Z 

noise of them falling and Vladimir shrugs to indicate that ^ | 

they are down again. Vladimir wakens Estragon.) 







200 


(hopelessly) 
Why will you never let me s 


Estragon 
leep? 




I felt lonely. 


Vladimir 




I was dreaming I was happy. 


Estragon 




That passed the time. 


Vladimir 




I was dreaming that — 


Estragon 




(violently) 
Don't tell mei 


Vladimir 




(There is silence 


.) 




I wonder... is he really blind. 




Blind? Who? 


Estragon 




Pozzo. 


Vladimir 




Blind? 


Estragon 




(Vladimir is in center stage facing out.) 




He told us he was blind. 


Vladimir 




Well what about it? 


Estragon 




It seemed to me he saw us. 


Vladimir 




You dreamt it. 


Estragon 




(He thinks.) 






Let's go. We can't. Ahl 






(He thinks.) 






Are you sure it wasn't him? 






Who? 


Vladimir 









201 


Godot. 


Estragon 




But who? 


Vladimir 




Pozzo. 


Estragon 
Vladimir 




(sure) 
Not at all! 






(He is less sure.) 


/ 


Not at all! 






(He is very uncertain.) 




Not at all! 




1 suppose 


Estragon 
I might as well get up. 






(He gets up and starts to walk when he discovers that hie 
boots hurt again. 


Ovi Did! 


i 




Vladimir 
I don't know what to think any more. 




My feet! 


Estragon 






(He sits down again and tries to take off his boots.) 


Help me! 






Vladimir 
Was I sleeping, while the others suffered? Am I sleeping now? 
. Tomorrow when I wake, or think I do, what shall I say 'of to-day? 
That with Estragon my friend, at this place, until the fall of night, 
I waited for Godot? 




(He moves down center left 


and turns.) 


That Pozzo passed, with his carrier, ; 
Probably. But in all that what truth 


and that he spoke to us? 
will there be? 




(Estragon, having struggled 
dozing off again. Vladimir 
musing.) 


with his boots in vain, is 
moves toward him slightly, 


He'll know nothing. He'll tell me about the blows he received and 
I'll give him a carrot. Astride of a grave and a difficult birth. 



202 



Vladimir (continued) 
Down in the hole, lingeringly, the grave-digger puts on the forceps. 
Ve have time to grow old. The air is full of our cries. 

(He listens.) 

But habit is a great deadener. 

(He looks again at Estragon.) 

At me too someone is looking, of me too someone is saying, He is 
sleeping, he knows nothing, let him sleep on. 

(He stops.) 
I can't go on! 

(He is horrified.) 
What have I said? 

(The boy enters.) 

Boy 
Mister.. . 

(Vladimir looks up.) 

Mister Albert . . . 

Vladimir 
Off we go again. Do you not recognize me? 

(The Boy moves closer to look at him. He is a little 
right of center stage.) 

Boy 
No Sir. 

Vladimir 
It wasn't you came yesterday. 



No Sir. 


Boy 




Vladimir 


This is your first time. 




Yes Sir. 


Boy 



(There is silence.) 

Vladimir 
You have a message from Mr. Godot. 



(The Boy is surprised.) 


203 


Boy 
Yes Sir. 




Vladimir 
(moving in slightly) 
He won't come this evening. 




Boy 
No sir. 




Vladimir 
But he'll come to-morrow. 




Boy 
Yes Sir. 




Vladimir 




(moving in more) 
Without fail. 




Boy 
(puzzled) 
Yes Sir. 




(There is silence.) 




Vladimir 
Did you meet anyone? 




Boy 
No Sir. 




Vladimir 
Two other. . . 




(He hesitates.) 




Men? 




Boy 
I didn't see anyone, Sir. 




(Vladimir turns away toward the left to think.) 




Vladimir 
What does he do, Mr. Godot? 




(When the Boy doesn't answer he turns back to him.) 




Do you hear me? 




Boy 
Yes Sir. 











204 


Vladimir 
Well? 




Boy 
He does nothing, Sir. 




(There is silence.) 




Vladimir 
How is your brother? 


/ 


Boy 
He's sick, Sir. 




Vladimir 
Perhaps it was he came yesterday. 




Boy 
I don't know, Sir. 




(In the silence Vladimir moves left.) 




Vladimir 
(softly) 
Has he a beard, Mr. Godot? 




Boy 
Yes Sir. 




Vladimir 
Fair or... or black? 




(He moves further left.) 




Boy 
I think it's white, Sir. 




(There is silence.) 




Vladimir 
Christ have mercy on us! 




(There is silence broken by the boy.) 




Boy 

What am I to tell Mr. Godot, Sir? 




Vladimir 
Tell him... 




(He turns toward the Boy.) 




Tell him that you saw me and that... that you saw me. 




(Vladimir advances, the Boy recoils before him.) 





205 

Vladimir (continued) 
You're sure you saw me, you won't come and tell me to-morrow 
that you never saw me J 

(They stare at each other. Vladimir springs at him 

to catch him but the Boy avoids him and exits running. G^ 

The day lights, give way to the night lights. Estragon Wj 

wakes, takes off his boots, gets up with one in each 
hand and goes and puts them down center front, then 
goes toward Vladimir.) 



What's wrong with you? 

Nothing 

I'm going 

So am I. 

Was I long asleep? 



Estragon 
Vladimir 
Estragon 
Vladimir 
Estragon 
Vladimir 



I don't know. 

(There is silence.) 

Estragon 
Where shall we go? 

Vladimir 
Not far. 

Estragon 
(pleading) 
Oh yes, let's go far away from here. 

Vladimir 
We can't, 

Estragon 
Why not? 

Vladimir 
We have to come back to-morrow. 

Estragon 
What for? 

Vladimir 
To wait for Godot. 





206 


Estragon 
Ah J He didn't come? 




Vladimir 

No. 




Estragon 
And now it's too late. 




Vladimir 
Yes, now it's night. 




Estragon 
And if we dropped him? 




(He is hopeful.) 




If we dropped him? 




Vladimir 
He'd punish us. 




(in the silence he looks at the tree.) 




Everything's dead but the tree. 




(He moves toward it.) 




Estragon 
(moving toward it) 
What is it? 




Vladimir 
It's the tree. 




Estragon 
Yes, but what kind? 




Vladimir 
I don't know. A willow? 




(They stand looking at the tree.) 




Estragon 
Why don't we hang ourselves? 




Vladimir 
With what? 




Estragon 
You haven't got a bit of rope? 




Vladimir 

No. 




Estragon 
Then we can't. 





207 



(There is silence.) 

Vladimir 
Let's go. 

Estragon 
Wait, there's my belt. 

(He moves to upstage center.) 

Vladimir 
It's too short. 

Estragon 
You could hang on to my legs. 

Vladimir 
And who'd hang on to mine? 

Estragon 
True. 

Vladimir 
(moving toward Estragon) 
Show all the same. 

(Estragon loosens the cord that holds up his trousers 
which, much too big for him, fall about his ankles. 
They look at the cord.) 

It might do in a pinch. But is it strong enough? 

Estragon 
We'll soon see. Here. 

(They each take an end of the cord and pull. It breaks. 
They almost fall.) 

Vladimir 
Not worth a curse. 

(There is silence.) 

Estragon 
You say we have to come back to-morrow? 

Vladimir 
Yes. 

Estragon 
Then we can bring a good bit of rope. 

Vladimir 
Yes. 

(There is silence.) 



Didi. 

Yes. 

I can't go on like this. 

That's what you think. 



208 
Estragon 

Vladimir 

Estragon 

Vladimir 



Estragon 
If we parted? That might be better for us. 

Vladimir 
(more cheerfully) 
We'll hang ourselves tomorrow. Unless Godot comes. 

Estragon 
And if he comes? 

Vladimir 
(happily) 
We'll be saved. 

(Vladimir takes off his hat, peers inside it, feels 
about inside it, shakes it, knocks on the crown, puts 
it on again. 



Well? Shall we go? 

Pull on your trousers. 

What? 

Pull on your trousers. 



Estragon 

Vladimir 

Estragon 

Vladimir 

Estragon 
(shocked) 
You want me to pull off my trousers? 

Vladimir 
Pull on your trousers. 

(Estragon looks down.) 

Estragon 
True. 

(He pulls up his trousers.) 








209 




Vladimir 
Well? Shall we go7 






Estragon 
Yes, let's go. 




10 


(They do not move. The liehts blaok out.) 




W ', 


J 

12 


16 




















■ 




























































■ 






■ 







Name 

John Dillon 
John Hawkins 
Boyd Masten 
Larry Hovey 
Doug Powell 







210 








REHEARSAL DATA 






Cast Members 






Address 


Phone Number 




817 Colorado 


PR 6-4318 




410 Bluemont 


PR 6-7786 




Goodnow Hall 


PR 6-7483 




315 North 16th 


JE 9-4033 




508 Sunset 


JE 9-3584 




























/ 
























' 












, 











211 




■ 






Rehearsal Record 




Date 


Place 


Time 


April 8, 1964 


Purple Masque Theatre 


7:00-9:00 p.m. 


April 9, 1964 


Purple Masque Theatre 


7:00-9:00 p.m. 


April 13, 1964 


Purple Masque Theatre 


7:00-9:00 p.m. 


April 14, 1964 


Purple Masque Theatre 


7:00-9:00 p.m. 


April 15, 1964 


Purple Masque Theatre 


7:00-9:00 p.m. 


April 16, 1964 


Purple Masque Theatre 


7:00-9:00 p.m. 


April 19, 1964 


Purple Masque Theatre 


2:00-4:00 p.m. 


April 20, 1964 


Purple Masque Theatre 


7:00-9:00 p.m. 


April 21, 1964 


Purple Masque Theatre 


7:00-9:00 p.m. 


April 22, 1964 


Purple Masque Theatre 


7:00-9:00 p.m. 


April 26, 1964 


Purple Masque Theatre 


7:00-9:00 p.m. 


April 27, 1964 


Purple Masque Theatre 


7:00-7:30 p.m. 


April 28, 1964 


Holton Hall 


7:00-9:30 p.m. 


April 29, 1964 


Dennison Hall 


7:00-9:30 p.m. 


April 30, 1964 


Dennison Hall 


7:00-9:30 p.m. 


Nay 3, 1964 


Purple Masque Theatre 


2:00-4:00 p.m. 


May 4, 1964 


Purple Masque Theatre 


7:00-10:00 p.m. 


May 5, 1964 


Purple Masque Theatre 


7:00-10:00 p.m. 


May 6, 1964 


Purple Masque Theatre 


7:00-10:00 p.m. 


May 7, 1964 


Purple Masque Theatre 


7:00-10:00 p.m. 


May 8, 1964 


Purple Masque Theatre 


7:00-10:00 p.m. 


May 10, 1964 


Purple Masque Theatre 


1:30-3:30 p.m. 


May 11, 1964 


Purple Masque Theatre 


7:00-10:00 p.m. 


May 12, 1964 


Purple Masque Theatre 


7:00-10:00 p.m. 


May 13, 1964 


Purple Masque Theatre 


7:00-10:00 p.m. 


May U, 1964 


Purple Masque Theatre 


6:30-9:30 p.m. 


May 15, 1964 (Performance) 


Purple Masque Theatre 


6:30-9:30 p.m. 


May 16, 1964 (Performance) 


Purple Masque Theatre 


6:30-9:30 p.m. 



212 



PERFORMANCE DATA 

Waiting for Godot was given on May 15th and 16th in the second 
semester of the 1963-1964 school year. Both performances were given 
in the Purple Masque Experimental Theatre, Gate 2, East Stadium. 

Call Performance 

First Dress Rehearsal 

May 11, 1964 5:30 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 

Second Dress Rehearsal (open) 

May 14, 1964 6:30 p.m. 8:00 p.m. 

First Performance 

May 15, 1964 6:30 p.m. 8:00 p.m; 

Second Performance 
May 16, 1964 6:30 p.m. 8:00 p.m. 



213 



LIST OF WORKS CONSULTED 



Books 



Beckett, Samuel. All That Fall . New York: Grove Press, Inc., 1957. 

. Hapny Days . New York: Grove Press, Inc., 1961. 

. Krapp's Last Tape and Embers . London: Faber and 

Faber, 1959. 

. Malloy . New York: Grove Press Inc., 1955. 

. Malone Dies. New York: Grove Press Inc., 1956. 

. Murphy . New York: Grove Press Inc., 1957. 



, and others. Our Exaeminatlon Round His Factification 

for Incamination of Work in Progress . London: Faber and Faber, 
1961. 

. Poems in English . London: A Wheaton and Co., 1961. 

. The Unnamable. New York: Grove Press Inc., 1958. 

. Waiting for Godot . New York: Grove Press Inc., 1954.. 

. Watt . New York: Grove Press Inc., 1959. 



Burris-Keyer, Harold and Edward C. Cole. Scenery for the Theatre . 
Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 194.1. 

Esslin, Martin. The Theatre of the Absurd . Garden City, New York: 
Doubleday & Company, Inc., 1961. 

Fowlie, Wallace. Dionysus in Paris . New York: Meridian Books, Inc., 
1960. 

Gassner, John. Producing the Play . New York: The Dryden Press, 
19a. 

Heffner, Hubert C, Samuel Selden, and Hunton D. Sellman. Modern 
Theat re Practice . New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts, Inc., 
1946. 

Hoffman, Frederick J. Samuel Beckett . The Language of Self . Carbondale: 
Southern Illinois University Press, 1962. 



214 



Jacobsen, Josephine, and William R. Mueller. The Testament of Samuel 
Beckett. Hew York: Hill and Wang, 196-1. 

Kenner, Hugh. Samuel Beckett . A Critical Study . New York: Grove 
Press Inc., 1961. 

Pronko, Leonard Cabell. Avant-Garde : The Experimental Theatre in 
France . Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California 
Press, 1962. 



Periodicals 



Briggs, R. and M, Barrett. "Beckett's world in Waiting." Saturday 
Review . June 8, 1957, 4:16. 

"Criticism." Saturday Review . February 9, 1957, 40:25. 

Genet. "Letters from Paris." New Yorker . March 4, 1961, 37:100. 

Gregory, H. "Prose and Poetry of Samuel Beckett." Commonweal . 

Hicks, G. "Beckett's World." Saturday Review . October 4, 1958, 
41:14. 

Hilman, R. "Absurd and Foolish-Theatre of Absurd." Commonweal . 
April 6, 1962, 74:40-1. 

Lovey, G. M. "Theatre of Absurd." Theatre Erts . November, 1962, 
46:20-4. 

Mercier, V. "Savage Humor." Commonweal . May 17, 1957, 66:188. 

Wilson, Robert N. "Samuel Beckett: The Social Psychology of Emptiness." 
The Journal of Social Issues . January 1964, 20:62-70. 



A PRODUCTION" BOOK FOR WAITJHS FOR C-ODOT 



t>y 



Ruth Ann Baker 
A., Fort Hays Kansas State College, 1962 



AH ABSTRACT OF A MASTER'S REPORT 



submitted in oartial fulfillment of the 



requirements for the degree 



MASTER OF ARTS 



Department of Speech 



KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY 
Manhattan, Kansas 



19 64 



This thesis presents the information used in presenting the 
play, Waiting for Godot as a thesis production on May 15 and 16 in 
the Purple Masque Theatre, Gate 1, East Stadium. The production was 
sponsored by the Department of Speech. This book is an attempt to record 
the information used so that someone reading the book would be able 
to understand how the production was done. This was done by placing 
in the book a ooDy of the program and the critic's reviews. The 
section of thematic material attempts to explain tho director's 
interpretation of the play and substantiate her theory of interpretation. 
The section on the actors discusses the director's view of each 
character and explains why the characters were costumed and presented 
as they were in relation to the basic thematic material. Costume sketches 
are included in this section. 

The setting is described in full with explanations given for 
choosing that particular stage setting end information on the 
construction of this set. There is an explanation for the choice of 
color scheme. Included in this section is a list of set props and 
a sketch of the floor plan. Pictures are included to. show the actors 
relation to the set. 

The lighting for this shew was fairly simple and easy to describe. 
Cue sheets corresponding to the script are included for both lights and 
sound. The allotted budget for this show was $150.00. A list of the 
expenditures is included. 

The script is typed out in full with all the blooking moves that 
were used by the director as well as some line interpretations. The 
script is the one used by this cast. The final pages show technical 
informtion about cast listing and rehearsal schedules as well as 
performances .